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So I have a square 2d array. The dimensions will be nxn. The array contains only zeros and ones. More specifically it will contain exactly n 1's. I need to check if all the 1's are "connected" spatially. Example:

    0 0 0 0
    1 1 1 0
    0 0 0 1
    0 0 0 0

This is invalid. Diagonal connections do not count. So far my code will check the array but only for lone single 1's. If the 1's are split into two groups of two for example, my check would miss it. Any advice is appreciated. Here is my code so far:

    int conected(char *stringptr) 
    {
int n=sqrt(strlen(stringptr));
int i=0;
int j=0;
int k=0;
char array2d[n][n];

for (j=0;j<n;j++) {
    for (i=0;i<n;i++) {
        array2d[j][i]=stringptr[k];
        k++;
    }
}

for (j=0;j<n;j++) {
    for (i=0;i<n;i++) {
        if (array2d[j][i]=='1') {
            if (i==0 && j==0) {//special case for first element
                if ((array2d[j][i+1]=='0') && (array2d[j+1][i]=='0')) {
                    return 0;
                }
            }
            else if ((j==0) && (i!=(n-1))) {//top row
                if ((array2d[j][i+1]=='0') && (array2d[j+1][i]=='0') && (array2d[j][i-1]=='0')) {
                    return 0;
                }
            }
            else if ((j==0) && (i==(n-1))) {// right corner
                if ((array2d[j+1][i]=='0') && (array2d[j][i-1]=='0')) {
                    return 0;
                }
            }
            else if ((i==0) && (j!=(n-1))) { //left column
                 if ((array2d[j][i+1]=='0') && (array2d[j+1][i]=='0') && (array2d[j-1][i]=='0')) {
                    return 0;
                }
            }
            else if ((i==(n-1)) && (j!=(n-1))) {// right column
                if ((array2d[j][i-1]=='0') && (array2d[j+1][i]=='0') && (array2d[j-1][i]=='0')) {
                    return 0;
                }
            }
            else if ((i==0) && (j==(n-1))) {//bottom left corner
                if ((array2d[j][i+1]=='0') && (array2d[j-1][i]=='0')) {
                    return 0;
                }
            }
            else if ((j==(n-1)) && (i!=(n-1))) {//bottom row
                if ((array2d[j][i+1]=='0') && (array2d[j-1][i]=='0') && (array2d[j][i-1]=='0')) {
                    return 0;
                }
            }
            else if ((j==(n-1)) && (i==(n-1))){ //bottom right corner
                if ((array2d[j][i-1]=='0') && (array2d[j-1][i]=='0')) {
                    return 0;
                }
            }
            else {
                if ((array2d[j][i-1]=='0') && (array2d[j+1][i]=='0') && (array2d[j-1][i]=='0') && (array2d[j][i+1]=='0')) {
                    return 0;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}   
return 1;

}

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How do you think that you can start? –  Aurelio De Rosa Oct 28 '11 at 3:06
    
Suppose you are at location (x, y). How do you translate that into C array coordinates? Now that you've translated the notation, how do you determine if there is a 1 adjacent to your current location? Finally, how do you track a sequence of adjacent 1s? –  ObscureRobot Oct 28 '11 at 3:09

2 Answers 2

Some advices:

  • once you have found the first 1 you could store good neighbors (that are 1 too) in a list, so that you could visit that ones (oh well, it's C and you don't have lists handy, just use a n sized array), otherwise you could use recursion (that would be tricky and funny to use actually)
  • you do know that there are n 1s, this mean that once you have found one you must find the remaining n-1 within the same group: if the group you found is lesser than n then you can return false
  • you can merge directions by using offsets (e.g. int dirs[4][2] = {{1,0},{-1,0},{0,1},{0,-1}}, this will be more elegant and less error prone, you can then loop over directions

I could provide you pseudo code but it would be cheating, you know..

Just for recursion's sake: a n-sized group of 1s is connected if one single 1 is connected to a n-1 sized group. That should point you to the right direction.

share|improve this answer
    
In order to use recursion, how would I pass the actually array though the function? –  Free_D Oct 28 '11 at 3:44
    
using a global variable (evil) or a pointer –  Jack Oct 28 '11 at 3:45
    
is array2d on its own a pointer? or would I need to malloc a new pointer? –  Free_D Oct 28 '11 at 3:52
    
It is a pointer of course, but declared as an array. There are some technical differences but you can use it as a pointer. –  Jack Oct 28 '11 at 3:58

Start with an array to keep track of the four separate 2-dimentional variables to save the locations of '1's in the array. This will make validation very easy:

int coords[4][2] = {0};

You also need a counter to make sure that only 4 coordinates with '1' were found:

int count = 0;

I also recommend defining some constants for readability:

const int X = 0;
const int Y = 1;

Then loop through your array to find all the instances of '1'. If the count exceeds 4, or is less than 4, fail.

for ( int x = 0; x < 4; x++ )
{
  for ( int y = 0; y < 4; y++ )
  {
    if ( array2d[x][y] == '1' )
    {
      if ( count < 4 ) // Make sure the 4 instances have not yet been found.
      {
        // Save the instance.
        coords[count][X] = x;
        coords[count][Y] = y;
      }

      if ( ++count > 4 ) // Increments count and then checks if greater than 4.
      {
        return false;
      }
    }
  }
}

if ( count != 4 )
{
  return false;
}

Next, loop through your array of located instances checking index offsets to verify that they are all adjacent. As soon as a non-adjacent index is found, fail. The following example, uses our count variable because it should be at 4 at this point and it doesn't really matter if we traverse the instances in reverse order, so long as they are all covered. Plus, it's great code re-use. (:

int x1, y1, x2, y2;

do
{
  count--; // decrement count so index offset is valid
  x1 = coords[count][X];
  y1 = coords[count][Y];
  x2 = coords[count-1][X];
  y2 = coords[count-1][Y];

  // Check for fail condition . . .
  if ( (abs(x1 - x2) != 1) && (abs(y1 - y2) != 1) )
  {
    // Both the X and Y coordinates of the two instances,
    // which should be adjacent, are greater than 1; fail.
    return false;
  }
}
while ( count > 0 );
// Each time through loop count will equal 3, 2, 1, and then exit.

In the above example, we don't want to run through the loop with count == 0 because the 0-offset was checked when count==1. Finally, if the PC makes it through the loop without failing, we know that exactly 4 instances of '1' were found and that they are all adjacent; success:

return true;
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