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I stumbled on this post by Dustin on using the with keyword to sandbox some modules:

http://dustindiaz.com/sandboxing-javascript

The actual code snippet is:

(function () {

  with (this) {
    {{ender}}
    {{library}}
  }

}).call({})

Can somebody please explain what he is doing in a better way? I'm not quite able to follow the advantage of using the with(this) here, and what {{ender}} and {{library}} mean. He compares this approach to using iframes (which I understand), but I am not able to quite get what he is trying to do here.

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

He is causing all variables (and functions) declared inside that function to be inside the context of this, i.e. the context of the wrapping function.

Normally if you create variable using var inside a function it's local to that function, and that's good. But what if you don't? In that case by using with all variables that would otherwise be global are instead in the context of the with (in this case the context is this of the function.)

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I tried defining a variable without the var keyword inside the with block, and it affects global scope, i.e. I am able to print that variable to console after the anonymous function has executed. –  jeffreyveon Oct 28 '11 at 5:44
    
Ok got it. When you do this.foo = 'bar' inside the with block, the foo property is set only within the with block, and is not set on the global window context. –  jeffreyveon Oct 28 '11 at 6:02
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