Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How to create a parser rule that accept whatever the previous rules doesn't accept?

What I am doing is that I try to rewrite c++ src files with ANTLR. My grammar only need to understand a subset of C++ and ignore the rest. By ignoring the rest, I mean I must still output the input line as it is. I cannot simply drop the input. For example, I may need to locate #if, #ifdef, #ifndef, #else, #elif, #endif but send any other valid C++ syntax back the to the output as it is.

Part of my solution looks like:

inputLines :  ( preprocessorLineSet  |  oneNormalInputLine ) ;
preprocessorLineSet  : ....;// pattern to match #if #else etc
oneNormalInputLine : (any_token_except_crlf)* CRLF {System.out.println($text)}; 
// a catch-all rule for anything including #if #else #endif, it must send any unrecognised input back to the ouput

I am assuming the parser would try the alternatives in the order listed in the grammar. So my preprocessorLineSet rule is listed before oneNormalInputLine in the inputLines rule. But, it seems like ANTLR still prefer oneNormalInputLine even if the input is of the #if pattern which I assume should be matched by the previous rule.

Is my assumption correct? Is it a correct way to implement this kind of ignore-the-rest logic?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

JavaMan wrote:

I am assuming the parser would try the alternatives in the order listed in the grammar. So my preprocessorLineSet rule is listed before oneNormalInputLine in the inputLines rule.

Correct, the rules are tried from left to right (preprocessorLineSet before oneNormalInputLine).

JavaMan wrote:

But, it seems like ANTLR still prefer oneNormalInputLine even if the input is of the #if pattern which I assume should be matched by the previous rule.

Wouldn't you need to exclude stuff like #if and #elif from any_token_except_crlf? Could you post a working example including a driver class that shows the unexpected behavior?

share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I want to know. How to write a parser rule that excludes #if #ifndef etc but includes everything else? –  JavaMan Oct 28 '11 at 6:47
    
Can you post your working grammar where ANTLR seems to prefer oneNormalInputLine over preprocessorLineSet? –  Bart Kiers Oct 28 '11 at 6:52
    
I think it is just a bug in my grammar. On further testing it looks for the first alternatives (preprocessorLineSet) correctly. It is a bug caused by my catch-all rule that doesn't exclude #if (so it looks like preprocessorLineSet is matched but actually it is oneNormalInputLine that matches it) . I am wondering how it is possible to write some rules to exclude a certain pattern? –  JavaMan Oct 28 '11 at 7:02
    
I need a concrete example, otherwise it's going to be guesswork on my part. Could you expand your question a bit more? –  Bart Kiers Oct 28 '11 at 7:23
    
Thx perhaps I should rewrite a new question as the actual problem is not related to the order of evaluating alternatives. –  JavaMan Oct 28 '11 at 7:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.