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i would like to know how to use the java.util.logging api, in order to have log message written in different log file depending on the level used. If the level is INFO then i would like to have the message written in /log/info.log and so on. The 3 defined level are severe, warning and info.

share|improve this question
    
which java logging api are you using? For log4j, java util logging and slf4j you can setup appenders that do what you want, but the config is different for each of them. – sbridges Oct 28 '11 at 6:00
    
Sorry, i'm not using Log4j, but i am using the java logging api provided by the jdk. – xtrem06 Oct 28 '11 at 6:08
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You use custom Handlers to write the Log Records.

Here is a simple, but complete example you can build upon.

import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.logging.FileHandler;
import java.util.logging.Level;
import java.util.logging.LogRecord;

public class LevelBasedFileHandler extends FileHandler
{
    public LevelBasedFileHandler(final Level level) throws IOException, SecurityException
    {
        super();
        super.setLevel(level);
    }

    public LevelBasedFileHandler(final String s, final Level level) throws IOException, SecurityException
    {
        super(s);
        super.setLevel(level);
    }

    public LevelBasedFileHandler(final String s, final boolean b, final Level level) throws IOException, SecurityException
    {
        super(s, b);
        super.setLevel(level);
    }

    public LevelBasedFileHandler(final String s, final int i, final int i1, final Level level) throws IOException, SecurityException
    {
        super(s, i, i1);
        super.setLevel(level);
    }

    public LevelBasedFileHandler(final String s, final int i, final int i1, final boolean b, final Level level) throws IOException, SecurityException
    {
        super(s, i, i1, b);
        super.setLevel(level);
    }

    @Override
    public void setLevel() { throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Can't change after construction!"); }

    // This is the important part that makes it work
    // it also breaks the contract in the JavaDoc for FileHandler.setLevel() 
    @Override
    public void publish(final LogRecord logRecord)
    {
        if (logRecord.getLevel().equals(super.getLevel())
        {
            super.publish(logRecord);
        }
    }
}

and here is how to use it

try
{
    // I use the Anonymous logger here, but any named logger will work as well
    final Logger l = Logger.getAnonymousLogger();
    l.addHandler(new LevelBasedFileHandler("/tmp/info.log", Level.INFO));
    l.addHandler(new LevelBasedFileHandler("/tmp/warn.log", Level.WARNING));
    l.addHandler(new LevelBasedFileHandler("/tmp/server.log", Level.SEVERE));

    l.info("This is an INFO message");
    l.warning("This is a WARNING message");
    l.severe("This is a SEVERE message");
}
catch (final IOException e)
{
    // ignore this for this example, you should never do this in real code
}

you will get three files in /tmp each with only the messages for each particular log level in them.

Note, I like the Dependency Injection style approach of requiring the Level in the constructor so you can't "forget" to call .setLevel() when using this sub-class. I also disabled .setLevel() because calling it and changing would break the semantics of the subclass"

Just for completeness you can use a java.util.logging.Filter to acomplish the same thing. It isn't as encapsulated but it is an alternative. It is more code and more verbose, thus more to not get right.

final FileHandler infoFileHandler = new FileHandler("/tmp/info.log");
infoFileHandler.setFilter(new Filter()
{
    public boolean isLoggable(final LogRecord logRecord)
    {
        return logRecord.getLevel().equals(Level.INFO);
    }
});

Personally I still like the sub-class approach better, it is less error prone and more self documenting as of its purpose and intent.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks nice answer. – xtrem06 Oct 28 '11 at 6:27
    
You do not need LevelBasedFileHandler as each Handle has setLevel. Just h=new FileHandler(...); h.setLevel(...) – bestsss Oct 28 '11 at 6:32
    
@bestss setLevel() only restricts to lower level messages, but accepts higher level messages. Read the javadoc on it. "Set the log level specifying which message levels will be logged by this Handler. Message levels lower than this value will be discarded." The requirement is only the specified levels. – Jarrod Roberson Oct 28 '11 at 6:36
    
@JarrodRoberson, indeed, although that's weird since the levels are virtually just numbers (i.e. range), but you still dont need to extend the class, in that case there is a built-in filter. As for doc (I used reimplemented jul as well, the original has way too many synchronizations) – bestsss Oct 28 '11 at 6:52

Since everyone tells about log4j... Here is a more useful answer:

Add different handles (file handlers for files) and set the levels on the handlers. The level for the logger has to allow the most verbose/relaxed in order to pass to the handlers.

I do not use the properties file to setup the jul.Logger but just some home-brewed xml. If you can't do it via the properties file, just use logger.getHandler() and set the appropriate levels.

share|improve this answer

Assuming you use log4j to do your logs. You will need to Write a custom appender, and add it to each logger.

  • Simple Instructions

In the custom appender , you simply have an if statement that looks at the log type, and does the necessary action. In particular, there are FileAppenders that can be extended to very naturally accomodate this need. http://logging.apache.org/log4j/1.2/apidocs/org/apache/log4j/FileAppender.html

  • More elegant example

Rather than coding your own , try to simply setup a config file !

http://www.vaannila.com/log4j/log4j-file-appender-example-1.html

This will do exactly what you need .

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, is it possible to do the same with the logging api provided by the jdk ? – xtrem06 Oct 28 '11 at 6:09
    
Actually, the solution provided in the exemple, is not what i'd like to achieve, especially the one with the config file. In this solution, logging a message on a file or the other depends on the package you are. – xtrem06 Oct 28 '11 at 6:14

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