Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

How do I set git to automatically push to a remote repo (including automatically providing my passphrase) after each commit to the local repo?

share|improve this question
    
What protocol are you pushing over? If it's prompting for password, I assume that this is either SSH or HTTP. –  Mark Longair Oct 28 '11 at 6:29
1  
Also, it's always helpful with git questions to at least mention what operating system you are using. –  Mark Longair Oct 28 '11 at 6:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 66 down vote accepted

First, make sure that you can push manually without providing your password. If you are pushing over HTTP or HTTPS, that will be a case of either creating a .netrc file with the login details or adding your username and password into the URL for the remote. If you're using SSH, you can either create a keypair where the private key doesn't have a password, or use ssh-agent to cache your private key.

Then you should create a file in .git/hooks/post-commit that contains the following:

#!/bin/sh
git push origin master

... customizing that line if you want to push to a remote other than origin, or push a branch other than master. Make sure that you make that file executable.

share|improve this answer
1  
Couldn't make ssh-agent remember my passphrase, so had to make it empty. Hope my wife won't hack my account :) –  ulu Oct 28 '11 at 7:26
    
Speaking of customization, what if I want to push some but not all branches in this manner? For example, I want to auto-push only the branches that have a corresponding remote branch noted in .git/config with the prefix feature/xy/. –  A-B-B Apr 2 '14 at 21:20
    
git push --all origin –  Yada Jun 29 at 8:39

Create a file named "post-commit" in the .git/hooks directory with the contents "git push", though if you want to automatically provide a password, so modification will be needed.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd upvote Mark Longair's answer if I could. –  Colin R Oct 28 '11 at 6:34
2  
I did it for you. –  ulu Oct 28 '11 at 7:27

If you start using more than the master branch, you might want to automatically push the current branch. My hook looks like this:

#!/usr/bin/bash

branch_name=`git symbolic-ref --short HEAD` 
retcode=$?
non_push_suffix="_local"


# Only push if branch_name was found (my be empty if in detached head state)
if [ $retcode = 0 ] ; then
    #Only push if branch_name does not end with the non-push suffix
    if [[ $branch_name != *$non_push_suffix ]] ; then
        echo
        echo "**** Pushing current branch $branch_name to origin [i4h_mobiles post-commit hook]"
        echo
        git push origin $branch_name;
    fi
fi

It pushes the current branch, if it can determine the branch name with git symbolic-ref.

"How to get current branch name in Git?" deals with this and other ways to get the current branch name.

An automatic push for every branch can be disturbing when working in task branches where you expect some sausage making to happen (you won't be able to rebase easily after pushing). So the hook will not push branches that end with a defined suffix (in the example "_local").

share|improve this answer

This git-autopush script allows you to setup a post-commit hook, similar to what has been recommended in "How configure automatic pushing?".
But for the passphrase, you need to run a ssh-agent.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.