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I'm new to Mustache.

Many templating languages (e.g., Django / Jinja) will let you extend a "parent" template like so...

base.html

<html><head></head>
    <body>
    {% block content %}{% endblock %}
    </body>
</html>

frontpage.html

{% extends "base.html" %}
{% block content %}<h1>Foobar!</h1>{% endblock %}

rendered frontpage.html

<html><head></head>
    <body>
    <h1>Foobar!</h1>
    </body>
</html>

I'm aware of Mustache's partials (e.g., {{>content}}), but those seem to be just includes.

Does template extension exist for Mustache? Or, failing that, is there at least some design pattern that effectively turns includes into template extension equivalents.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 30 down vote accepted
+50

I recently found myself in the same boat, except I came from a mako background.

Mustache does not allow for template extension/inheritance but there are a few options available to you that I know of.

  1. You could use partials:

    {{>header}}
        Hello {{name}}
    {{>footer}}
    
  2. You could inject template pre-processing functions into the context for each template that needs to inherit from some other page:

    {{#extendBase}}      
        Hello {{name}}
    {{/extendBase}} 
    

    Hash:

    {
       "name": "Walden",
       "extendBase": function() {
           return function(text) {
               return "<html><head></head>" + render(text) + "</body></html>"
           }
       }
    }
    
  3. Prepend and append the desired HTML to the relevant pages in your controller.

  4. Have a layout template ala:

    {{>header}}
        {{{body}}}
    {{>footer}}
    

    And render the body in your controller, passing that to the layout template as a variable named body.

  5. Implement template inheritance, pre-mustache, in your code that loads templates.

I wouldn't, however, use the triple mustache because I don't want unescaped HTML to be appearing anywhere, it's just too risky in my opinion.

If someone else has a better solution to this problem I'd love to hear it as well, since I haven't yet taken the plunge in any one of these directions.

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Should #4 be "triple mustache?"--{{{body}}} –  Chris W. Nov 4 '11 at 4:02
    
Yes, unfortunately you are correct which rules out #4 for me. I've updated the answer. –  Walden Nov 4 '11 at 16:07
1  
Ultimately, creating reusable sub-templates and implementing inheritance in the template loading code (i.e. #5) is a lot more flexible, and safer, in general. The problem with template inheritance is that when writing the outer template, you can never have a good sense of what is required (or not required) in a child template. This often results in including JS/CSS which may be necessary for a particular child page (but unnecessary for another) in the outer template. The only way around this problem when using template inheritance is to pass the JS/CSS requirements as a variable. –  Walden Nov 4 '11 at 16:29
3  
Twitter's version of mustache supports template inheritance. –  Walden Apr 4 '12 at 20:23
    
(@Walden Perhaps you should add a no. 0 or no. 6 to your list and mention Hoogian? Thanks for adding the comment anyway :-) ) –  KajMagnus Apr 18 '12 at 19:14
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You want Nunjucks!
Author's introduction explains why.
All other solutions for inheritance are Bad.
It is basically Django (really jinja2) template style, with beautiful inheritance.
It's very new but looks awesome.

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1  
That doesn't answer the original question at all. –  mikkom Sep 26 '13 at 10:47
    
It really looks like twig, i like it! –  httpete Jan 4 at 13:55
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I've proposed this to the specification for Mustache here:

https://github.com/mustache/spec/issues/38

Currently mustache.java, hogan.js and phly_mustache support template inheritance.

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So does GRMustache. –  Gwendal Roué Dec 21 '12 at 7:58
    
Although, regarding Hogan.js, you wouldn’t know it from the documentation: github.com/twitter/hogan.js/issues/70 –  Paul D. Waite May 5 at 0:40
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Mustache doesn't do template extension.

If you really want template extension then you may want to use a library purpose built with this functionality for you language/framework of choice.


FYI, I'm using Node.js/Express, so I will probably end up using https://github.com/fat/stache

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W Stash isn't maintained, and hogan.js, the suggest replacement, doesn't seem to implement extends. –  mikemaccana Mar 13 '12 at 19:24
    
Twitter's Hoogian does seem to support inheritance, now. See this recent commit: Hogan 3. Add template inheritance, ... –  KajMagnus Apr 18 '12 at 19:10
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You could use variables containing HTML. A "triple mustache" like {{{variable}}} will return unescaped HTML. It's not exactly the same as template extensions, but you could render frontpage-content.html and then put its output in a content variable that gets passed to base.html.

(I added -content to the frontpage.html filename with the expectation that such a naming pattern will help keep the filenames manageable.)

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If you're happy with a server-side only code, Nun is a Mustache-like templating system with extends functionality via its 'template overrides' feature - modelled on django. While it works, however, it is no longer maintained by its author.

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I'm playing around with this right now in Python (note I'm the creator of Mako), adding in a dynamic context that captures sections seems to be doing the right thing, though I'd need to test this a lot more.

Basically we are using lambdas, where a "<" prefix indicates "inherit from this template" (similar to the syntax discussed at https://github.com/mustache/spec/issues/38) and a "$" prefix indicates "this is an inherited section".

import pystache

class NameSpace(object):
    def __init__(self, renderer, vars_={}):
        self.renderer = renderer
        self._content = {}
        self.vars = vars_

    def add_content(self, name, value):
        self._content[name] = value

    def __getattr__(self, key):
        if key in self.vars:
            # regular symbol in the vars dictionary
            return self.vars[key]
        elif key.startswith("<"):
            # an "inherit from this template" directive
            name = key[1:]
            return inheritor(self, name)
        elif key.startswith("$"):
            # a "here's a replaceable section" directive
            name = key[1:]
            if name in self._content:
                # if we have this section collected, return the rendered
                # version
                return sub_renderer(self, name)
            else:
                # else render it here and collect it
                return collector(self, name)
        else:
            # unknown key.
            raise AttributeError(key)

def sub_renderer(namespace, key):
    def go():
        def render(nested):
            return namespace._content[key]
        return render
    return go


def collector(namespace, key):
    def go():
        def render(nested):
            content = namespace.renderer.render(nested, namespace)
            namespace.add_content(key, content)
            return content
        return render
    return go


def inheritor(namespace, name):
    def go():
        def render(nested):
            namespace.renderer.render(nested, namespace)
            return namespace.renderer.render_name(name, namespace)
        return render
    return go

So here's some templates. base.mustache:

<html>

{{#$header}}
    default header
{{/$header}}

{{#$body}}
    default body
{{/$body}}

{{#$footer}}
    default footer, using {{local key}}
{{/$footer}}


</html>

hello.mustache:

{{#<base}}

{{#$header}}
    new header
{{/$header}}

{{#$body}}
    new body, with {{local key}}
{{/$body}}

{{/<base}}

and then to play with three levels deep, subhello.mustache:

{{#<hello}}

{{#$footer}}
    im some new footer
{{/$footer}}

{{/<hello}}

Rendering hello.mustache like this:

renderer = pystache.Renderer(search_dirs=["./templates/"])

print renderer.render_name("hello",
                    NameSpace(renderer, {"local key": "some local key"}))

output:

<html>

    new header

    new body, with some local key

    default footer, using some local key


</html>

Rendering subhello.mustache:

print renderer.render_name("subhello",
                    NameSpace(renderer, {"local key": "some local key"}))

output:

<html>

    new header

    new body, with some local key

    im some new footer


</html>

I just wrote this in twenty minutes, and I've only used handlebars.js a little bit in the past and pystache for the first time just now so the whole "mustache" idea is not deep for me yet. But this seems to work ?

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