Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In an ASP.NET MVC app, I have code that boils down to the following:

public ActionResult Test() {
    string query;
    try {
        query = GenerateQueryString();
    }
    catch (Exception ex) {
        ModelState.AddModelError("error", ex.Message);
    }

    ... do additional validation ...

    if (ModelState.IsValid) {
        return RedirectToAction("Success?" + query);
    }

    return View(); // Show validation messages
}

The above code has a compile error ... query might not be initialized.

However, the logic in the code will clearly initialize query before using it.

What is the best way to resolve this issue?

share|improve this question
    
What is the issue with assiging a default or null value to the variable, concern for speed, memory, other? –  Lloyd Oct 28 '11 at 7:22
    
From the answers so far, I don't like the code smell caused by initializing query to a value that will never be used. –  Scott Rippey Oct 28 '11 at 7:27
    
If there is no QueryString to be assigned the string value would be equivilent to string.Empty so why not just set the value accordingly, it removes ambiguity and makes the code easier to read. –  Lloyd Oct 28 '11 at 7:31
    
If an exception is thrown, then I will never use the query variable (because I check ModelState.IsValid). Therefore, it is meaningless to initialize to string.Empty or null or "Error". If the compiler is going to force me to choose one, then I guess I'll choose null, but what other choices do I have? –  Scott Rippey Oct 28 '11 at 7:43

9 Answers 9

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The C# compiler is looking at your code and seeing that the value of the variable is initialized in a try block and is then used later on. It can see that a logical branch of execution exists where an exception is thrown, is caught, and then the subsequent code is executed with an uninitialized value.

The simplest way to stifle the error is to assign a default value to the field. null is sufficient. As you're adding the error to the MVC model state and are checking that value later on before accessing query, you shouldn't be in a situation when the default value will matter.

share|improve this answer

You are wrong, What if GenerateQueryString throws an exception? What will be the value of Query?

You might want to do a query = "Error"; or something in your catch block. This because appareantly you want the application to run if an exception in GenerateQueryString is thrown.

EDIT

I would recommend against presetting query with a default value. This because the meaning is different. A default value is different than a certain value at a certain moment. Doing so will also prevent the compiler from warning you when you create a new code path but forget to setup a value for query

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly ... I don't want to use a "default value", because even null has meaning (null means that my code might need to look for null later). My code knows that either query has a value, or ModelState has an error, so I was hoping to avoid using a "default value" just to make the compiler happy. –  Scott Rippey Oct 28 '11 at 7:47

If there is exception in the call to GenerateQueryString the value of query will be undefined.

Try

string query = string.Empty;

to have a definite assignment to the variable.
Alternatively, if an exception should abort the execution, this will work too:

string query;
try {
    query = GenerateQueryString();
}
catch (Exception ex) {
    ModelState.AddModelError("error", ex.Message);
    return View();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Do you think assigning a "dummy value" is a good idea, just to prevent the compiler warning? –  Scott Rippey Oct 28 '11 at 7:15
    
Considering it is the only way to get rid of the warning, yes. Or... make sure your exception handling doesn't continue. Should it? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Oct 28 '11 at 7:16
    
There might be many ModelErrors due to validation, so I'd like them all to show, so I'd prefer to avoid short-circuiting. –  Scott Rippey Oct 28 '11 at 7:20
    
The best way is to ensure that the variable has a meaningful value. I personally prefer to throw an exception and abort the method, instead of continuing with some dummy value. However in some test/prototype code, = string.Empty or = null has it's uses. –  SWeko Oct 28 '11 at 7:22

The Code is NOT clearly initialized. When the GenerateQueryString() Method throws an Exception, no value will be set. You should set the String to null and check for null before you use it, als you don't break in the catch-block.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you think assigning a "dummy value" is a good idea, just to prevent the compiler warning? –  Scott Rippey Oct 28 '11 at 7:15
    
Since the catch part adds a model error (therefore setting ModelState.IsValid to false), I won't need to null check. –  Scott Rippey Oct 28 '11 at 7:18

Just because YOU know that it will be initialized (it may not be by the way in your code), the COMPILER can't know that - it's called the Halting problem.

So the compiler errs on the side of caution, something .net does a lot (e.g., no fallthrough in switch..case).

share|improve this answer

The thing here is that local variables must be initialized before read - they won't be initialized by default and this prevents from bugs programmers often makes. Some time ago I was looking for the answer to this simple situation:

bool a = true, b;
if (a == true) //here everything is OK, because a is initialized
   b = true;
if(b == false) //here you get an error, I thought b == false by default
   return;

I found on stackoverflow deep explanations, why it works so(couldn't find at the moment which I was reading). But you can read Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence interesting article. Maybe it will explain what I tried to say :)

Resume:

In your case you need to initialize query or set variable in catch block

share|improve this answer

Just change the declaration of query in: string query = string.Empty;.

share|improve this answer

The problem is that query is initialised in the try block, but query is declared in the block above. You must initialise it at the top level block.

share|improve this answer

It could just be that your GenerateQueryString() throws an exception. Personally, I prefer to initialize my variables, just to be on the safe side. For this reason you might just initialize to query to:

string query = String.Empty;

It doesn't hurt to be on the safe side.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.