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I have piece of code which generates some Random number and prints out on console. However I am curious about the pattern which it prints, Such as,

import java.util.*;
public class Test
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Random random = new Random(-6732303926L);
            for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
                System.out.println(random.nextInt(10)+" ");    
    }
}

Result : 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 - Every number in new line.

And if you change this code a bit! like,

import java.util.*;
public class Test
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Random random = new Random(-6732303926L);
            for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
                System.out.println(random.nextInt(11)+" ");    
    }
}

Result : 8 9 2 2 10 3 8 7 0 10 - Every number in new line.

What is the reason of 0123456789 which is not random at all!?

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4  
Would be nice to credit the original source –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Oct 28 '11 at 8:00
    
Ohhh found one more - javacodegeeks.com/2011/10/weird-funny-java.html –  doNotCheckMyBlog Oct 28 '11 at 8:38
1  
Yes, JCG.com are reposting articles from various blogs, but they mention the original source at the end of the article. –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Oct 28 '11 at 8:44

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The reason for the sequence is so that one can test software by making Random predicable with predictable and repeatable sequences using its next methods. Whenever a particular long seed parameter is a parameter to the Random constructor, the instanced Random object is supposed to return the same sequences of values through its next methods. This is a deliberate feature of java.util.Random.

java.util.Random has two constructors:

Random()

and

Random(long seed)

The constructor without a long integer seed uses the system time for creating a seed value for the pseudo random number generator. No two instantiations of Random will use the same seed and you should get a very good pseudo-random sequence. A Random instantiation using the constructor without a seed creates an instance with unpredictable sequences of values that will be pseudo-random.

The constructor with a seed value is intended only for making Random deterministic with predictable sequences using its next methods. The typical use of a seed is for software test purposes where results must be predicable and repeatable. Every instance of Random that uses the same long seed integer will create the same sequence of results every time. The particular long you used causes the sequence to be 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 over and over again when getting one of 10 integer values using nextInt(10) method. This and other predictable sequences that are repeatable every time software executes are very useful for testing software and are not meant for creating unpredictable pseudo-random sequences.

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0123456789 is random too, in this case - it's about as likely to come up as 14235682907, which would no doubt not have given you any cause for concern.

You spotted a fluke, basically. If you print the next 10 numbers in the first case, they're not preserving any obvious order.

It's like flipping a coin - the pattern HHHHHHHH is just as likely to come up as the exact pattern HHTHTTHH; there's a 1 in 28 chance of each coming up, as at any of the 8 steps there's a 50% chance of it going wrong. But the first pattern looks like it's broken, whereas the second doesn't.

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I think it is random... you are using a specific seed for the random function. You just found the seed that will give you the numbers 0 - 9, in order.

EDIT: Apparently, this is the algorithm:

The java.util.Random class implements what is generally called a linear congruential generator (LCG). An LCG is essentially a formula of the following form: numberi+1 = (a * numberi + c) mod m

Source: here

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JavaMex knows all. He is also a StackExchange member ;o) umm @Neil Coffee I think is his name. He knows his Java and Random very well. Up vote to you for sharing your source so nicely. –  Ellie Kesselman Mar 3 '13 at 22:29

The Random class is a pseudo-random number generator. Thus it is not truely random, but instead relies on mathematical operations performed on an initial seed value. Thus, certain seeds will produce certain (potentially interesting/fun) sequences

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Yes, especially regarding the fact that certain seeds will produce certain fun but not necessarily "significant" sequences. Or rather, not "significant" unless one has motive, from a cryptographic point of view, and I think that that is beyond our scope. I enjoyed your answer, it made me smile. Thank you for that. –  Ellie Kesselman Mar 3 '13 at 22:32

Creating random with a seed ensures a certain behavior. Especially, creating two instances of Random with the same seed, will always behave identically. Someone found out (via brute force, I guess) that using this particular seed together with the first 10 nextInt(10), creates such a seemingly ordered sequence. This sequence is pseudo-random updon first creation, but can be reproduced. Changing anything in the slightest gives a different result.

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Random is based on the seed you give to it, if you want to get true random numbers, use time functions as seeds, and you'll get a real random number series.

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