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I sometimes wonder how to handle construction of objects which can throw in their constructor. I wonder how you do it.

Consider the following snippet. I have a class, named TCPMessage, which represents a message my "server" receives over TCP. If the received message is invalid (i.e. the CRC32 calculated in the TCPMessage's constructor doesn't check out), TCPMessage's constructor throws.

So below is how I do it. Do you know of any better way? I'm asking, because it doesn't really look too elegant.

void TCPConnection::handleRead(
  const boost::system::error_code& error,
  char* read_buffer
)
{
  if (!error) {
    TCPMessage* message = NULL; // being verbose here
    try {
      message = new TCPMessage(read_buffer);
    } catch (const char* e) {
      std::cerr << "Instatiating TCPMessage: " << e << std::endl;
    } catch (...) {
      std::cerr << "Instatiating TCPMessage: unknown exception." << std::endl;
    }

    if (message) {
      // if created succesfully
      // process the message and delete it
      SeekurJrRC::Core::Driver& driver = boost::asio::use_service<SeekurJrRC::Core::Driver>(_io_service);
      driver.processMessage(*message);
      delete message;
    }
  }
  delete [] read_buffer;
}

Oh yeah, an I know about knowing better than to use char* read_buffer and deleting it in another function. shared_ptr's the way, I know.

share|improve this question
    
Never write something like if(message). Well, unless you have implemented an operator bool of course. This is useless, because the condition will always be true and thus does not check anything useful. Either operator new throws, or it returns something that is not null. So checking for non-null just does nothing good. Move whatever is in that if-clause into try{ }. – Damon Oct 28 '11 at 8:53
    
@Damon: in the OP's code it does work: if new throws an exception, that exception is caught, but message is never assigned to, so it'll still be null, making the if(message) check somewhat meaningful. (Of course, the code should be redesigned so you don't need to jump through these hoops, but that's a different issue) – jalf Oct 28 '11 at 8:57
1  
If you know that you shouldn't use char*, why do you do it? It's a big part of what is wrong with this code, and what makes exceptions a pain to deal with. If you know better, then do better. If you write crappy code and then go go "How do I write better code?", and at at the same time say "by the way, I do know how to write better code", what do you expect us to say? – jalf Oct 28 '11 at 8:58
    
@jalf: You are of course right, my bad. But it's still a somewhat ill construct. The code that depends on construction being successful should be inside the try clause in my opinion (without any check, the compiler breaks control flow if an exception comes up). This just makes sense and makes life easier, too. – Damon Oct 28 '11 at 9:03
    
@jalf; It's just that I wanted you to focus on the TCPMessage part; I'm in progress of refactoring some code (of which above is a part) into more sensible form and changing char* to shared_ptr is next on my list. Hope it explains my situation. – user312650 Oct 28 '11 at 9:04
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your problem isn't exceptions, it's raw pointers and lack of RAII.

Sanitizing your code a bit:

void TCPConnection::handleRead(
  const boost::system::error_code& error,
  char* read_buffer
)
{
  if (!error) {
    try {
      TCPMessage message(read_buffer);
      SeekurJrRC::Core::Driver& driver = boost::asio::use_service<SeekurJrRC::Core::Driver>(_io_service);
      driver.processMessage(message);

    } catch (const char* e) {
      std::cerr << "Instatiating TCPMessage: " << e << std::endl;
    } catch (...) {
      std::cerr << "Instatiating TCPMessage: unknown exception." << std::endl;
    }
  }
}

new calls should be wrapped in RAII objects, not dangle around freely in your user code. delete calls should never be explicit, but instead be handled by the destructors defined in your RAII objects.

Then your objects will automatically get destroyed and clean up after themselves if an exception is thrown, and you don't need your over-complicated "try/catch/check-for-success" dance. If an exception was not thrown, you continue normally. If it was thrown, you leave the try block, and your objects are destroyed automatically.

Note that here you don't actually need the try/catch block any more. The only thing you use the catch for is to print an error message. It's not necessary for the program flow or to prevent resource leaks. Normally you would handle the error where you can meaningfully do so. Presumably that's somewhat higher up the call tree, where you know what to do about a failed read. At this level, it makes more sense to just let the exception escape to indicate that an error occurred.

void TCPConnection::handleRead(
  const boost::system::error_code& error,
  char* read_buffer
)
{
  if (!error) {
    TCPMessage message(read_buffer);
    SeekurJrRC::Core::Driver& driver = boost::asio::use_service<SeekurJrRC::Core::Driver>(_io_service);
    driver.processMessage(message);
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Somewhere you have to handle the exception. If you don't want to clutter your code everytime where you do new TCPMessage(read_buffer) then you can use special syntax for constructor to handle exception only at one place. e.g.

class TCPMessage {
...
public:
  TCPMessage (const char *read_buffer)
  try {
    ...
  }
  catch(const char *p){ ... }
  catch(...) { ... }
...
};
share|improve this answer

What is wrong with enclosing the processing in the try-catch-block?

void TCPConnection::handleRead(
  const boost::system::error_code& error,
  char* read_buffer
)
{
  if (!error) {
     try {
         std::auto_ptr<TCPMessage> message(new TCPMessage(read_buffer));

         // if created succesfully
         // process the message and delete it
         SeekurJrRC::Core::Driver& driver = boost::asio::use_service<SeekurJrRC::Core::Driver>(_io_service);
         driver.processMessage(*message);
     } catch (const char* e) {
         std::cerr << "Instatiating TCPMessage: " << e << std::endl;
     } catch (...) {
         std::cerr << "Instatiating TCPMessage: unknown exception." << std::endl;
     }
  }
  delete [] read_buffer;
}

Of course, you should use suitable smart pointers for exception safety, when another part of the code can throw. It might also be good to not handle all exceptions right in this function.

share|improve this answer
    
What if operator<< throws? Anyway, the exceptions should be re-thrown. And you should get rid of delete. – curiousguy Oct 28 '11 at 21:05

Usual way is to handle exceptions at the point where you can resolve them.

For example, if the "connection was dropped" exception is thrown, you can handle it somewhere where you can ask the user what to do about it : either reconnect, or maybe close the application.

You do not necessarily need to handle the exception in that function. I see you are only printing the error message. If that's the only thing to do, then it is ok. As you said, it would be better to use smart pointers. Something like this :

void TCPConnection::handleRead(
  const boost::system::error_code& error,
  char* read_buffer
)
{
  if (!error) {
    try{
    std::auto_ptr< TCPMessage > message( new TCPMessage(read_buffer) );
    SeekurJrRC::Core::Driver& driver = boost::asio::use_service<SeekurJrRC::Core::Driver(_io_service);
    driver.processMessage(message.release());

    } catch (const SomeException e) {
      std::cerr << "Instatiating TCPMessage: " << e << std::endl;
    } catch (...) {
      std::cerr << "Instatiating TCPMessage: unknown exception." << std::endl;
    }

  }
  delete [] read_buffer;
}

Take a note that it is better to catch some custom exception type, instead of const char*.

share|improve this answer
    
This is unsafe. Get rid of the delete call, and don't catch exceptions by value. – curiousguy Oct 28 '11 at 21:02

Constructors should only take care of resource allocation related jobs. if we need to have complex initialization before we use it, we need a dedicated init member function. That's how ATL does. This way we could avoid throwing exceptions in constructors.

Smart pointers do not solve the problem, we might have memory leaks when an exception is thrown in the constructor.

    std::autor_ptr<Widget> pWidget(new Widget()); 

The above statement will do three things at least:

   1. call new operator to allocate memory
   2. construnct an object by calling its constructor 
   3. constuct the smart poniter. 

If an exception is throw in the second step, the smart pointer is not constructed, it's never be destoryed. As a result, we leak the memory allocated in the first step.

share|improve this answer
    
Who told you this nonsense? – curiousguy Oct 28 '11 at 20:59
    
@curiousguy: I made a simulation to demo this. the problem is I have no idea how to paste it in comment. – Bruce Adi Nov 1 '11 at 7:05
    
Please take a look at the 2 links: codepad.org/IRzZR0Cx codepad.org/lLJIyKwE – Bruce Adi Nov 1 '11 at 7:10
    
There is no leak demonstrated here. – curiousguy Nov 1 '11 at 14:41

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