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Example 1

var Reptile = function () {
  var reptile = this;
   this.showBla = function() {
       alert(reptile.bla);
   }
}

var turtle = new Reptile();
turtle.bla = 'whatever';
turtle.showBla();

Example 2

var Reptile = function () {
   this.showBla = function() {
       alert(this.bla);
   }
}

var turtle = new Reptile();
turtle.bla = 'whatever';
turtle.showBla();

Is example 1 legit? As it sometimes seems to screw things over to define "this" directly in the constructor...?!?

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Looks just fine. You're not defining anything in the constructor, you just store a reference. No problem at all. –  jAndy Oct 28 '11 at 10:05
    
You cannot define this yourself. It's always available and cannot be overwritten. –  pimvdb Oct 28 '11 at 10:06
    
Since both examples are bulletproof legit, can you provide the code that sometimes screws things over? –  Esailija Oct 28 '11 at 10:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, it is legit and is useful in cases where you may need to define a function inside a function that may be invoked in a way there "this" will pointer to something else. Books recommend naming this variable var that = this;

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Example 1 is a common pattern for maintaining the reference to the current instance. In a callback situation, like:

setTimeout(turtle.showBla, 0);

Example 1's var reptile... saves the this reference and will show 'whatever'. Example 2 will show undefined, unless you manually assign scope on the calling side (e.g., in jQuery):

setTimeout($.proxy(turtle.showBla, turtle), 0);
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