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I'm creating a game applet for use on my website and I hate Swing's way of laying out/rendering components. So I thought I could set up an arrangement that allowed me to do things, how I like to do them (manually tell the window manager when to render a component as well as using absolute positioning for the layout). Here's my code, GameApp.java:

import javax.swing.JApplet;

public class GameApp extends JApplet {

    private Background background;
    private Foreground foreground;

    @Override
    public void init() {
        background = new Background();
        foreground = new Foreground();
    }

    @Override
    public void start() {
        background.render(this);
        foreground.render(this);
    }
}

Foreground.java:

import java.awt.event.MouseAdapter;
import java.awt.event.MouseEvent;
import javax.swing.JButton;

public class Foreground extends UIElement {

    private String buttonText;
    private JButton startButton;

    @Override
    public void fetchDependencies() throws Exception {
        buttonText = "Play!";
        startButton = new JButton(buttonText);
    }

    @Override
    public void create() {
        setLayout(null);
        startButton.setBounds(350, 260, 100, 30);
        startButton.addMouseListener(new MouseAdapter() {

            @Override
            public void mouseEntered(MouseEvent e) {
            }

            @Override
            public void mouseExited(MouseEvent e) {
            }
        });
        add(startButton);
    }
}

Background.java:

import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.Image;
import java.awt.Toolkit;
import java.net.URL;

public class Background extends UIElement {

    private Image backdrop;

    @Override
    public void fetchDependencies() throws Exception {
        backdrop = Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().getImage(new URL("mywebpage"));
    }

    @Override
    public void create() {
    }

    @Override
    protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
        g.drawImage(backdrop, 0, 0, parent);
    }
}

UIElement.java:

import javax.swing.JApplet;
import javax.swing.JComponent;

public abstract class UIElement extends JComponent {

    protected JApplet parent;

    public UIElement() {
        try {
            fetchDependencies();
        } catch(Exception e) {
            System.err.println(e);
        }
    }

    public abstract void fetchDependencies() throws Exception;
    public abstract void create();

    public void render(JApplet p) {
        addParent(p);
        create();
        p.getContentPane().add(this);
    }

    private void addParent(JApplet ja) {
        parent = ja;
    }
}

When I run this applet it will only display the most recently added UIElement. Why is that?

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1 Answer 1

Top level containers (like JApplet, JFrame) use a BorderLayout. So when you add a component to the content pane of the applet the component gets added to the "CENTER" by default. So only the last component added is displayed since all components occupy the same area.

I suggest you learn how to use Swing works and don't attempt to create your own custom rendering.

You can't just tell the window when to render components. There are different times the painting of a component is done automatically without your knowing about it that is why Swing has a well defined paint mechanism.

share|improve this answer
    
Well I know about system repaints and application repaints, and I know I can't do anything about the system repaints, and that's fine. I just want to be able to control the view a little more. So what do you think? That I should null the layout of the JApplet as well? –  Benjamin Oct 28 '11 at 14:36
1  
@Benjamin I would learn a LayoutManager that allows you to place the components the way you want. NullLayout isn't really an option in my opinion. You can take a look at the GridBagLayout, the GridLayout, and the BoxLayout. Some other exists that might just be exactly what you need. –  Laf Oct 28 '11 at 15:18
    
You should use a layout manager. I see nothing in your question that would suggest otherwise. Your problem is not the layout manager. Your problem is that you are trying to stack two components on top of one another which has nothing do do with layout managers which deal with 2-dimensional layout of components, not 3D layout. Maybe you need to use a JLayeredPane or maybe something like the Background Panel. –  camickr Oct 28 '11 at 17:49

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