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I cannot manage to find a nice way to implement the rails behavior of objects navigation rails has in a pure ruby script.

Say I have an object of class Parent, with an accessor to an Array of objects of class Child, I'd like, when I manipulate a Child object, to be able to get the Parent easily, like that :

class Parent
  attr_accessor :children

  def initialize
    @children = Array.new
  end
end

class Child
end

parent = Parent.new
first_child = Child.new
second_child = Child.new
parent.children << [ first_child, second_child ]

a_child = parent.children.first

get_parent_from_child = a.child.parent

The part I'm interested in is, of course, the last line in which I attempt to get the "parent" object from one of its children.

How could I implement it easily and cleanly ?

I was thinking of adding an accessor to the child object, but I'm not sure how to make sure this value is set everytime I attach a child object to a parent object.

Is there an easy and clean way of doing that in ruby ?

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can achieve the has_many behavior from Rails by using a custom container class, like Rails does.

class Parent
  attr_reader :children

  def initialize
    @children = ChildCollection.new(self)
  end
end

class Child
  attr_accessor :parent
end

class ChildCollection
  def initialize parent
    @children = []
    @parent = parent
  end

  def new
    child = Child.new
    child.parent = @parent
    @children << child
    child
  end

  def << child
    child.parent = @parent
    @children << child
    self
  end
end

And some example code to add children to the parent:

parent = Parent.new
child1 = parent.children.new
child2 = Child.new
child3 = Child.new
parent.children << child2 << child3

puts "Parent is: #{parent.object_id}"
puts "Child1's parent is: #{child1.parent.object_id}"
puts "Child2's parent is: #{child2.parent.object_id}"
puts "Child3's parent is: #{child3.parent.object_id}"

You may want to throw on some other helpful methods like remove and each (so you can have ChildCollection include the Enumerable module and get all the cool stuff that comes with that) but this should be enough to get you started.

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In the Parent class I used attr_reader :children instead of attr_accessor because we need to make sure that our container contains a reference to the proper parent object. We are still free to add and remove children from the collection. –  Ian Oct 28 '11 at 16:20
    
Oh yes, that looks like what I was looking for. I'll try to implement it on monday in my project. Thanks, Ian. –  Baramin Oct 28 '11 at 18:23

You don't have to fully expose your children you know, there's nothing wrong with fully controlling access to your data.

class Parent
  def initialize
    @children = [ ]
  end

  # You get a shallow copy of the children, you can
  # change the individual children but not the tree
  # structure.
  def children
    @children.dup
  end

  # We take ownership of the children when you add them.
  def add_children(*kids)
    kids.each { |k| k.parent = self }
    @children += kids
  end

  def remove_children(&block)
    @children.delete_if(&block)
  end
end

# This would probably have some sort of payload and
# a sensible "==" implementation.
class Child
  attr_reader :parent
  def parent=(p)
    raise StandardError => 'Not allowed to change parents!' if @parent
    @parent = p
  end
end

Then child.parent works fine and if you want to remove children you'd tell the parent which ones to remove:

# Remove the children with even payloads.
parent.remove_children { |c| c.payload % 2 == 0 }

# Remove the children with odd payloads and copy them.
odds = [ ]
parent.remove_children do |c|
  kill_it = c.payload % 2 != 0
  odds << Child.new(c.payload) if(kill_it)
  kill_it
end
share|improve this answer
    
Nice upgrade to ckruse's answer, but I prefer Ian's as it's more what I was looking for. Thanks a lot for your help, mu (is too short), hehe, I like your name. –  Baramin Oct 28 '11 at 18:24
    
@Baramin: No worries, having several options is a good thing as is going with what works for you. –  mu is too short Oct 28 '11 at 18:52

Write an own accessor for children in the class Parent in which you set a parent attribute for each child added to the array. Do the reverse when removing children from the array. This is how I would do it.

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Ok. I could do that indeed, add a add_child and delete_child to the parent object. I'll start implementing it this way for now, and if noone else has a better solution, will validate your answer. I sure would prefer a way that would allow things like new_child = parent.children.new() for example. –  Baramin Oct 28 '11 at 14:18
    
You can do this, too. Derive a class from array and implement a method new_child(), which sets the property parent and after that calls self << new_child. –  ckruse Oct 28 '11 at 14:24

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