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I want to build a set of objects built on top of an interface that represent different types of values:

integers
strings
datetime

And these objects will be able to perform operations like:

IData intValue = new IntData();
IData intValue2 = new IntData();

bool result = intValue.EqualsTo(intValue2);

IData dateTimeData = new DateTimeData();
IData dateTimeData2 = new DateTimeData();

bool result = dateTimeData.GreaterThan(dateTimeData2);

So I need an interface, but how do I setup the ability to compare etc? What about if the type is a IEnumerable?

public interface IData
{

}
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1  
What happens if the underlying concrete types are different? In other words, what happens for the line intValue.GreaterThan(dateTimeData2);? –  dlev Oct 28 '11 at 14:02

1 Answer 1

I think you are basically looking for a C# version of a variant type. The closest thing that I can think of right now is C# dynamics:

  public class DynamicComparer : IComparer<dynamic>
  { // ...

Unfortunately, that would be illegal, so you could resort to

  public class DynamicComparer : IComparer<object>
  {

and implement the logic you wanted inside that.

Brainwave:

Another approach that just occurred to me, is to provide a unifying class with implicit comversions - yeah I don't recommend this - but I do love to think of the most creative ways in which to answer the original question:

public class MyData : IData, IComparable<MyData>
{
    public static implicit operator MyData(string s)    { /* ... */ }
    public static implicit operator MyData(DateTime dt) { /* ... */ }
    public static implicit operator MyData(int dt)      { /* ... */ }

    // implement IComparable<MyData> members...

    // e.g.:
    private dynamic variant_data; // or, the desired default representation
                                  // for comparisons, e.g. string?
}

Update Here is a semi-fullblown example of how you could abuse implicit conversions to just about achieve what you want (almost transparent comparison of disjunct types): https://ideone.com/WwI87

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public class Program
{
    public class MyData : IEquatable<MyData>, IComparable<MyData>
    {
        public static implicit operator MyData(string s)    { var data = new MyData(); /* TODO */ return data; }
        public static implicit operator MyData(DateTime dt) { var data = new MyData(); /* TODO */ return data; }
        public static implicit operator MyData(int dt)      { var data = new MyData(); /* TODO */ return data; }

        // implement IComparable<MyData> members...
        // implement IEquatable<MyData> members...

        // override object.Equals()
        // override object.GetHashCode()
        public static bool operator <(MyData a, MyData b) { return Comparer<MyData>.Default.Compare(a,b) == -1; }
        public static bool operator >(MyData a, MyData b) { return Comparer<MyData>.Default.Compare(a,b) == +1; }

        // e.g.: 
        // the desired default representation for comparisons, e.g. string?
        // use 'dynamic' on C# 4.0 and beyond
        private object/*dynamic*/ variant_data;

        public int CompareTo(MyData other)
        {
            // TODO implement your own logic
            return GetHashCode().CompareTo(null != other ? other.GetHashCode() : 0);
        }

        // TODO implement your own equality logic:
        public bool Equals(MyData other)
        {
            if (ReferenceEquals(null, other)) return false;
            if (ReferenceEquals(this, other)) return true;
            return Equals(other.variant_data, variant_data);
        }

        public override bool Equals(object obj)
        {
            if (ReferenceEquals(null, obj)) return false;
            if (ReferenceEquals(this, obj)) return true;
            if (obj.GetType() != typeof (MyData)) return false;
            return Equals((MyData) obj);
        }

        public override int GetHashCode() { return (variant_data != null ? variant_data.GetHashCode() : 0); }
        public static bool operator ==(MyData left, MyData right) { return Equals(left, right); }
        public static bool operator !=(MyData left, MyData right) { return !Equals(left, right); }
    }

    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var cmp = Comparer<MyData>.Default;

        string s = "123";
        int i = 234;
        DateTime dt = DateTime.Now;

        if (-1  == cmp.Compare(s, i))  Console.WriteLine("s < i"); 
        if (+1 == cmp.Compare(dt, i)) Console.WriteLine("dt > i");

        // or even:
        if ((MyData) s > i) Console.WriteLine("s > i");
        if ((MyData) dt< i) Console.WriteLine("dt < i");
    }
}
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had a tiny additional brainwave; I don't recommend using implicit conversions liberally, but anyway: things are possible. See updated full example on ideone.com/WwI87 –  sehe Oct 28 '11 at 14:34

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