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I'm using the webapp framework on GAE, and to show the results of a query, I'm doing a get() on the query object, then iterating on it if get() returned anything, for example:

query = Employee.all().filter("some_boolean_property = ", True)
if query.get():
    for employee in query:
        # output employee.name etc.
        # ...
else:
    # output "no records found" message
    # ...

The reason I'm doing the get() and not just doing an else on the for loop is because I'm outputting the data in a table, and I don't want to write the table code if there are no results. Previously instead of the get() I was doing fetch(1), but I believe they are equivalent (i.e, get() just executes the query but with a maximum of one result). Therein lies my question - is this true that I can use get() in this way, and is this the best way to do find out if a query returns results or not? Might count(1) be better?

I'm not concerned with the number of results, just if there are any or not.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

An alternative might be to set a flag inside the loop to say that at least one record is found, then test that flag for your "no records found" case.

found = False
query = Employee.all().filter("some_boolean_property = ", True)
for employee in query:
    found = True
    # output employee.name etc.
    # ...
if not found:
    # output "no records found" message
    # ...

This has the advantage of removing a call to the datastore.

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I like it - although it makes my code slightly more verbose it does have the advantage like you say of removing the extra datastore call. Thanks! –  fishwebby Oct 29 '11 at 14:40

Just call fetch to get the number of results you need, then iterate over them. For example:

query = Employee.all().filter("some_boolean_property = ", True)
results = query.fetch(20)
if results:
    for employee in results:
        # Do stuff
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Yes, but I want to iterate over all results, so unless I give fetch() an argument, that would be another access to the datastore. Unless I used fetch(1) to see if there was any data (which was my original question, if fetch(1) or get() was a good way to do this or not) –  fishwebby Nov 2 '11 at 15:43
    
@fishwebby There must be a practical limit on how many results you want to display to users in a single page. A page with 1000 or 10,000 or 100,000 results on it is not particularly useful to anyone. –  Nick Johnson Nov 2 '11 at 23:31
    
Agreed, but until Google enables full text search, I'm cheating by loading all the results, then using a datatable to do pagination and search locally on the client... admittedly this will only work while the result set is small (which it is at the moment - hopefully Google will do that soon though, but that's another topic :-) –  fishwebby Nov 3 '11 at 14:41

You can use the Query class's count method. If you provide a limit it will only check that many. Here's an example:

query = Employee.all().filter("some_boolean_property = ", True)
if query.count(limit=1):
   for employee in query:
       pass
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Ah ok - so how would that compare to doing fetch(1) or get() on the query? –  fishwebby Oct 29 '11 at 14:39
    
This will still require two RPCs, when only one is required. –  Nick Johnson Nov 1 '11 at 6:06
    
It will only fetch the count instead of including entity data in the return. It will do two RPC calls, but is essential in the case where you will only do the second fetch based on the results of the count. –  Matt Williamson Nov 1 '11 at 19:30

'count' returns just the number of results found with the query

'get' and 'fetch' return the entire entity

so the 'count' is much more efficient if you only want the count of a query

Also I dont see why people are running a loop after a query for 1 item. If you use get() you will only receive 1 item that matches so you dont need a loop. All you are really checking is if you actual got an entity or count back from the query.

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The OP wants to show the results in addition to knowing if there are any. –  Nick Johnson Nov 1 '11 at 6:06
    
@fishwebby - If you want all the results then you should fetch as many as you can ( I think 100 is a rule of thumb for GAE ) is you believe you will have more then that I believe you use an offset with the fetch. If there are no results you will get 'None' and you just test with an if statement before you go into a loop. There is no need using count if you want to return entities. –  JBourne Nov 2 '11 at 22:31

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