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I'm running a query to find out how much estimated work was done on a factory floor and how much time was actually tracked in comparison to the amount of hours that station has available.

I"m doing this to determine which machines we need to purchase more of. Anything that we have a usage factor of over 100% is something that we're over capacity.

The issue is that I'm getting astronomically high numbers for some operations. It is impossible that 5 men working each at a machine could track more than 120 hours however the result I am getting is well over a thousand.

What I do in the query is take all the batches, which have tasks and sum all of the estimated time of each tasks. I sum all of the time_elapsed in the batch_log and I multiply the hours_open by the number of machines of that operation.

Because of this, deburr should have a max of 120 hours as they are open 24 hours a day and there are 5 deburring stations. Does anything glaring jump out when looking at this query?

Please let me know if you need more info.

SELECT 
  DATE(bl.start_time) as date_tracked,
  o.name as operation,
  SUM(TIME_TO_SEC(bl.time_elapsed)/ 3600)  as time_elapsed,
  SUM(t.estimated_nonrecurring + t.estimated_recurring) / 3600  as estimated,
  o.hours_open as hours_open,  
    (count(distinct m.id)) as machine_count,
  hours_open * (count(distinct m.id)) as total_hours,
  (sum(TIME_TO_SEC(bl.time_elapsed)) / 3600) / (count(distinct m.id)) as time_elapsed_usage
FROM
  batches b
INNER JOIN 
  tasks t on b.id = t.batch_id
INNER JOIN  
  batch_log bl on b.id = bl.batch_id
INNER JOIN
  operations o on b.operation_id = o.id 
INNER JOIN
  machines m  on b.operation_id = m.operation_id
WHERE 
  bl.time_elapsed < "8:00:00"

GROUP BY
  b.operation_id,
  DATE(bl.start_time)
ORDER BY date_tracked, o.id

So I've started again and once I get to this point I seem to have duplication in the time elapsed:

select 
  batches.operation_id,
  date(batch_log.start_time) as date,
  SEC_TO_TIME(SUM(TIME_TO_SEC(batch_log.time_elapsed))) as elapsed,
    sum(tasks.estimated_nonrecurring + tasks.estimated_recurring) as estimated_time

from
  batches
INNER JOIN batch_log on batches.id = batch_log.batch_id
INNER JOIN tasks on batches.id = tasks.batch_id
WHERE batches.id not in (
-1,
-2,
-3,
-4,
-5,
-6,
-7,
-8,
-9,
-10,
-11,
-12,
-13,
-14
)
group by Date(batch_log.start_time), operation_id 
order by batch_log.start_time, batches.operation_id

EDIT: What am I doing wrong in the above? If I knew this I could be careful to structure queries better. Honestly, I haven't been able to find anything and I've been digging through SQL books. Even if I could get an answer on the smaller statement I could make some progress. Working on other stuff for now.

share|improve this question
1  
Maybe you've just hired such amazing people they are able to work more than 24 hours in a day. Where work might be defined as 'record'. :) –  Nathan Feger Oct 28 '11 at 15:26
1  
Truly though, have you tried just looking at a single machine's records for a day and sanity checked the numbers? –  Nathan Feger Oct 28 '11 at 15:26
1  
You are INNER JOINing to machines, although you never use it (only ever through subqueries). Without knowing your table design, and some sample data, it's a little hard to know if that's the actual issue, though. Removing it will likely increase performance... Gah, some of this would be so much nicer to roll up with CTEs. –  Clockwork-Muse Oct 28 '11 at 15:44
    
There's a reason this post has been languishing despite the bounty. You have not told us your database schema. How can we debug your query until you exactly specify the structure of your tables and the constraints placed on them? –  rsj Nov 5 '11 at 11:10
    
Would I dump my database information? Or describe the tables? –  dah Nov 7 '11 at 17:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+150

Clarifications please...

Obviously Batch_Log multiple records per batch.
Batch table, distinct batch ID.

Now, on to tasks, operations and machines. 
Can a batch have multiple tasks? 
Can a batch have multiple operations? 
Is the importance of distinct machines per operation critical?

That said, here's my review of your situation... First, I'm are getting only the batch logs time elapsed less than 8:00:00 per your query. With that aggregation pre-grouped into single qualified batches, I can then do simple join to batches and tasks by those batch IDs. I can SUM() from tasks without worrying about double-counting as the starting basis is a single batch ID. Group all this by a batch ID simplifies the NEXT level joining to the Operations AND machines table

Then, for the ones that are of aggregations, I have pre-aggregated those so they will return a single record respectively and reduce the possibility of Cartesian COUNT() and SUM() issues.

WITH respect to machines. You have machines associated with an operation, but you are then grouping by operation and date. That being said, and it appears an operation CAN (and does) cross dates, one machine would be accounted for each day. Will that cause some possible skewed numbers??? Not sure, haven't thought that far through.

SELECT STRAIGHT_JOIN
      SmryByBatch.Operation_ID,
      SmryByBatch.Date_Tracked,
      SUM( SmryByBatch.Time_Elapsed ) Time_ElapsedByOpDate,
      SUM( SmryByBatch.Time_Elapsed ) / OpMachines.Machine_Count Time_ElapsedPerMachine,
      SUM( SmryByBatch.TaskEstByBatch ) TaskEstByOpDate,
      o.Name Operation,
      o.hours_open,
      OpMachines.Machine_Count,
      o.Hours_Open * OpMachines.Machine_Count as Total_Hours
   FROM 
       ( SELECT  
            b.Operation_ID,
            PreQuery.Batch_ID,
            PreQuery.Date_Tracked,
            PreQuery.TotalTimeElapsed / 3600 as Time_Elapsed,
            SUM( t.estimated_nonrecurring 
               + t.estimated_recurring ) / 3600 as TaskEstByBatch
         FROM 
            ( SELECT
                    bl.batch_id,
                    DATE( bl.Start_Time ) date_tracked,
                    SUM( bl.time_elapsed ) TotalTimeElapsed
                 FROM
                    batch_log bl
                 WHERE
                    bl.time_elapsed < "8:00:00"
                 GROUP BY
                    bl.batch_ID,
                    DATE( bl.Start_Time ) ) PreQuery

            JOIN batches b
               ON PreQuery.Batch_ID = b.ID

            JOIN Tasks t
               ON PreQuery.Batch_ID = t.Batch_ID

        GROUP BY
           b.Operation_ID,
           PreQuery.Batch_ID ) SmryByBatch

      JOIN Operations o
         ON SmryByBatch.Operation_ID = o.ID

         JOIN ( select m.Operation_ID,
                       COUNT(distinct m.id)  machine_count
                   from
                      machines m
                   group by
                      m.Operation_ID ) OpMachines
            ON o.ID = OpMachines.Operation_ID

   GROUP BY 
      SmryByBatch.Date_Tracked
      SmryByBatch.Operation_ID,

   ORDER BY
      SmryByBatch.Date_Tracked,
      SmryByBatch.Operation_ID
share|improve this answer
    
Can a batch have multiple tasks? Yes. Can a batch have multiple operations? No. Is the importance of distinct machines per operation critical? I don't think so, the only reason I'm doing that is so that I can count the number of hours that a station is open and multiply by the number of machines. EG: Deburr is open for 24 hours, there are five deburring machines so 24 hours * five machines should give me 20 hours. Thanks for the help. –  dah Nov 4 '11 at 18:00
    
@dah, if you could provide some sample data in your original question would be great showing some such times batch load, operation, tasks. If a single batch can span multiple operations, then you'll get duplicated time if the batch / batch load is not specific to an operation... Even if sample data SHOWING the true relationships and where the splits CAN go and DO go would help. –  DRapp Nov 4 '11 at 18:17
    
A single batch can't span operations. –  dah Nov 4 '11 at 19:58
    
Batches have an operation_id. –  dah Nov 4 '11 at 19:58
    
@Dah, Don't know if you even tried the query provided, but it should be good as the group by would not have impacted per your comment of batch 1:1 operations –  DRapp Nov 5 '11 at 20:55

Usually when I want to do something complex like this I start one chunk at a time and check the data so I know what I should expect.

So to develop I start with using SELECT * and work out my joins first. If it is a large dataset, I may filter by a where clasue to select only one set of records, a batch in your case. THen I can go back to the raw data one table at atime and check my results.

Once I know that I haven't accidentally made the number of records too big, then I start adding in the real columns I want. Instead of formulas, I select the actual columns that will be in the formulas. This helps me accurately develop the formulas. THen I add in the formulas and any necessary grouping.

PS. I suspect they are right that machines is causing the isse, but I wanted to give you a set of tools for figuring out future problems.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for teaching me to fish. –  dah Oct 28 '11 at 17:02

You have a join to machines, but never use it, and you have a sub-query to retrieve the machine count. These should not both be in the query.

Thus, I think your problem is that you either need to remove the join, or remove the machine count, use the machines join in your select, and add a group by machines to your query.

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1  
+1 Snap! ....... –  Mark Bannister Oct 28 '11 at 15:50

Given that you are joining to machines in the main query, the summed values of hours_open and estimated are already being inflated (multiplied) by the number of machines involved in each operation.

The simplest solution would be to remove the inner join to machines in the main query, although the query would probably be more efficient if the link was retained and the subqueries for counts of machines replaced with count(distinct m.id). The summed values of hours_open and estimated should also be divided by count(distinct m.id), except where you want them inflated by the number of machines (in total_hours, where the multiplication by sub-queried value should be removed).

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Snapback! :) –  Briguy37 Oct 28 '11 at 15:58
    
Trying this, seems to still have duplication, I edited the query. –  dah Oct 28 '11 at 16:39

Its a bit of a guess, but it looks like you have multiple machines per operation, which means you'll be multiplying your hours_elapsed by the number of machines..

If I were you, I'd remove the aggregations and the group by, which should leave you with your raw daya, and any duplication should be easy to spot..

SELECT 
  DATE(bl.start_time) as date_tracked,
  o.name as operation,
  bl.time_elapsed / 3600 as time_elapsed,
  t.estimated_nonrecurring + t.estimated_recurring / 3600  as estimated,
  o.hours_open as hours_open,  
  (select COUNT(id) from machines where operation_id=o.id) as machine_count,
  hours_open * (select COUNT(id) from machines where operation_id=o.id) as total_hours,
  (bl.time_elapsed / 3600) / (select COUNT(id) from machines where operation_id=o.id) as time_elapsed_usage
FROM
  batches b
INNER JOIN 
  tasks t on b.id = t.batch_id
INNER JOIN  
  batch_log bl on b.id = bl.batch_id
INNER JOIN
  operations o on b.operation_id = o.id 
ORDER BY date_tracked, o.id

EDIT:

Does this give you something more sensible (untested)?

SELECT 
  DATE(bl.start_time) as date_tracked,
  o.name as operation,
  SUM(TIME_TO_SEC(bl.time_elapsed)/ 3600)  as time_elapsed,
  SUM(t.estimated_nonrecurring + t.estimated_recurring) / 3600  as estimated,
  SUM(o.hours_open) as total_hours,  
    count(distinct m.id) as machine_count,
  (sum(TIME_TO_SEC(bl.time_elapsed)) / 3600) / (count(distinct m.id)) as time_elapsed_usage
FROM
  batches b
INNER JOIN 
  tasks t on b.id = t.batch_id
INNER JOIN  
  batch_log bl on b.id = bl.batch_id
INNER JOIN
  operations o on b.operation_id = o.id 
INNER JOIN
  machines m  on b.operation_id = m.operation_id
WHERE 
  bl.time_elapsed < "8:00:00"
GROUP BY
  b.operation_id,
  DATE(bl.start_time)
ORDER BY date_tracked, o.id

EDIT2:

Does this give you something more sensible (untested)?

SELECT 
  DATE(bl.start_time) as date_tracked,
  o.name as operation,
  TIME_TO_SEC(bl.time_elapsed)/ 3600 as time_elapsed,
  SUM(t.estimated_nonrecurring + t.estimated_recurring) / 3600  as estimated,
  SUM(o.hours_open) as total_hours,  
    count(distinct m.id) as machine_count,
  (TIME_TO_SEC(bl.time_elapsed) / 3600) / (count(distinct m.id)) as time_elapsed_usage
FROM
  batches b
INNER JOIN 
  tasks t on b.id = t.batch_id
INNER JOIN  
  batch_log bl on b.id = bl.batch_id
INNER JOIN
  operations o on b.operation_id = o.id 
INNER JOIN
  machines m  on b.operation_id = m.operation_id
WHERE 
  bl.time_elapsed < "8:00:00"
GROUP BY
  b.operation_id,
  DATE(bl.start_time)
ORDER BY date_tracked, o.id
share|improve this answer
    
Yup, I'm actually looking to multiply by the number of machines per operation. As if we have 8 hours available per paint station and we have two paint machines then we should have 16 hours. –  dah Oct 28 '11 at 16:23
    
YEs, but you're multiplying by the number of machines in your subquery, and then again by having the join as well.. –  StevieG Oct 28 '11 at 16:36
    
Ahh! The hours_elapsed aren't what I want multiplied, just the hours available. I getcha. I'll try your query. –  dah Oct 28 '11 at 17:00
    
Looks like still some duplication. Maybe closer though. –  dah Oct 28 '11 at 17:02
    
can you be a bit more specific? –  StevieG Oct 28 '11 at 17:04

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