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Okay, so here's the context. I've been up for almost a day straight now working on the legendary 8-puzzle problem. I have my heuristics down and my A_star algorithm down. We are required by the project spec to solve it using three different heuristic values. I can solve it for any one of the three individually, but when I go to solve them in succession, I get a ridiculous loop, and it never finds the correct successor state.

I believe my problem is with my pointers. I have a class, State, as defined below that has an int** array and a pointer to a State (its parent).

EDIT: I have to use int** as defined by the project specification, otherwise I would gladly use a pointer.

State   (int **bd, State* prnt);
State   (const State& other);
~State  ();

I am then declaring them as such:

State::State(int **bd, State* prnt) {

// allocate the board
board = new int*[3];
for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    board[i] = new int[3];
}

// fill in the board
for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < 3; j++) {
        board[i][j] = bd[i][j];
        //board[i][j] = 
    }
}

// set the parent
parent = prnt;

}

State::State(const State& other) {
// allocate the board
board = new int*[3];
for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    board[i] = new int[3];

State::~State() {
//std::cout << "Deconstructing " << this << endl;
for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    delete board[i];
delete [] board;
delete parent;
parent = other.parent;

}

State::~State() {
//std::cout << "Deconstructing " << this << endl;
for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    delete board[i];
delete [] board;
delete parent;

}

State& State::operator=(const State &rhs) {
if (&rhs == this) {
    return *this;
}

for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    delete board[i];
}
delete [] board;

// allocate the board
board = new int*[3];
for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    board[i] = new int[3];
}

// fill in the board
for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < 3; j++) {
        //board[i][j] = rhs.board[i][j];
        board[i][j] = rhs.getIntAtCoor(j, i);
    }
}

//delete parent;
// set the parent
parent = rhs.parent;

// set g
g = rhs.g;
f = rhs.f;
hType = rhs.hType;

return *this;

}

I don't give the exact declarations -- some of it is simple like int = int. I just can't quite figure it out. I feel like either my delete parent is wrong or my parent = other.parent is wrong (or both).

Thank you for your time and help,

Tyler

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5  
Don't use dynamic arrays. Use std::vector instead. –  Cat Plus Plus Oct 28 '11 at 15:37
    
Also slow us operator= –  Mooing Duck Oct 28 '11 at 15:39
1  
You do not delete a pointer, you delete pointee, an object pointed by a pointer. –  mloskot Oct 28 '11 at 15:40
    
In modern C++ you should avoid the new operator, and never use the delete operator. Obviously this doesn't apply to really low-level stuff (allocators, memory pools, smart pointers, etc), but you don't often write those. –  deft_code Oct 28 '11 at 15:44
1  
@deft_code There is nothing pedantic in my comment. Getting things straight and precisely helps to understand them. Also, If you don't use terminology of the domain you work with, you are on the straight way to shot yourself in the foot. –  mloskot Oct 28 '11 at 16:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Upgrading your code-style may force the errors to evaporate. In other words new and delete are error prone and should be avoided when better alternative exists.

For management of the cells consider:

  • std::shared_ptr: can be used to void the delete calls
  • std::vector can be used to avoid the new and delete calls
    Note you should use it like std::vector<int> board( 3 * 3 ) and board.at( x + y * 3 ).
  • And best of all just use a static array int board[3][3]. No allocation at all.

Also child states do not own their parent states. It's the other way around. So child states shouldn't delete their parents. You can still safely keep a parent pointer, but make sure you cleanup the children before you allow a parent to go out of scope (deleted or otherwise). All of this cleaning and deleting doesn't neccessarily involve new at all. Your State class looks small enough that is doesn't matter if they are copied by value. In which case just have the parent use a std::vector<State> m_children and the compiler will take care of the rest.

share|improve this answer
    
See, I wrote it all without a delete parent and it worked fine up until trying to run it with three different heuristics right in a row. It will finish the first heuristic fine, but gets stuck in the second. Do you see anything in any of my declarations that might cause this behavior? –  Tyler Bell Oct 28 '11 at 16:05
    
@TylerBell: try running your code after commenting out all delete calls. See if that fixes it, which would confirm memory errors. Other than that, the behavior you describe sounds like you have a global or static variable somewhere that is misbehaving. –  deft_code Oct 28 '11 at 17:33
    
Thank you for not recommending std::vector<std::vector<int>> for use as a matrix. Locality of data would likely be terrible and the performance hit significant. That said, don't use at() in a tight loop. at() performs bounds checking. Of course, it depends on how performance sensitive the code is. –  Ed S. Sep 16 '12 at 23:52

You don't show the full definition of the copy constructor but I assume that the parent = other.parent line is in there. In that case, wouldn't the parent be responsible for its own lifetime and the delete parent in the destructor shouldn't exist at all.

Also note that you need to at least disable (private declaration) or implement the copy assignment operator.

Better still, use a vector of vector for your 2d array and let the language work for you.

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I'm sorry, I forgot to include it, but I do have an assignment operator defined. I've added it to the post above. And I really wish I could use a vector, but we have to do it the way defined (CS assignment). :-( –  Tyler Bell Oct 28 '11 at 15:40

Perhaps not a direct answer, but you are going against best practices for C++.

It's easier and definitely more maintainable to use vectors for this problem.

size_t row_sz = 3;
size_t col_sz = 3;
std::vector<int> board(row_sz * col_sz, 0);

int i = 0;
for (size_t r = 0; r < 0; r++)
for (size_t c = 0; c < 0; c++)
  board[ r * row_sz + c ] = i++;

Multidimensional arrays are much easier handled with the above strategy as well. It just breaks less. If you really want the row/col access, write a wrapper around it.

struct Matrix {
  int &operator()(size_t r, size_t c);
  const int &operator()(size_t r, size_t c) const;

private:
  std::vector<int> data;
};
share|improve this answer
    
I've edited my question to include the information, thank you for making me be more specific! :: we are required by the specification to use int**. :-( –  Tyler Bell Oct 28 '11 at 15:44
    
@TylerBell Well it's there in case someone stumbles upon it with google. For what it's worth, no one in industry would ask you to use int** generally. If I code reviewed an interface with that, I wouldn't even tolerate it. –  Tom Kerr Oct 28 '11 at 15:50

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