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Is there a multiprocessing module for Perl? Something that has similar functionality to what's offered by Python's multiprocessing module.

I understand I could build similar functionality using Perl, but I'm looking for something already implemented.

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1  
Don't forget that Perl has fork and exec right out of the box. –  Platinum Azure Oct 28 '11 at 15:43
    
Yeah that's the one I added it to the question as well. –  jkysam Oct 28 '11 at 15:43
    
@PlatinumAzure The tricky part is "The multiprocessing package offers both local and remote concurrency," I don't know if there is a portable abstraction for the remote part. –  Sinan Ünür Oct 28 '11 at 15:45
    
@SinanÜnür Oops, of course. –  Platinum Azure Oct 28 '11 at 15:55
    
If I needed remote concurrency, I'd start looking at something like gearman and Gearman::XS. If local, then fork/exec or maybe Parallel::ForkManager to manage the processes. –  runrig Oct 28 '11 at 16:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I think Forks::Super comes pretty close. It has a few features for running an arbitrary subroutine (or external command) in a background process, monitoring and signalling the background process, and making interprocess communication a little less painful.

use Forks::Super;

sub do_something { my @args = @_; ... }
$process = fork { sub => \&do_something, args => [@args] };
$process->wait;


my $x = 42;
my @y = ();
my %z = ();
sub do_something_else {
    $x = 19;
    @y = qw(foo bar);
    %z = (foo => 'bar');
}
$process = fork { sub => 'do_something_else', share => [\$x, \@y, \%z ] };
$process->wait;
# $x, @y, and %z are now updated with changes made in background process


# create your own pipes to use for IPC
use IO::Handle;
pipe my $child_read, my $parent_write;
pipe my $parent_read, my $child_write;
$parent_write->autoflush(1);
$child_write->autoflush(1);
sub square {
    while (my $x = <$child_read>) {
        print {$child_write} $x ** 2, "\n";
    }
    close $child_write;
}
$process = fork { sub => 'square' };
print {$parent_write} "9\n";
my $result = <$parent_read>;    # should be "81\n";
close $parent_write;

# or use the standard I/O handles for IPC
sub square_root {
    sleep 1 && seek STDIN,0,1 while eof(STDIN); # ok, this is a workaround for an existing bug :-(
    while (my $x = <STDIN>) {
        print sqrt($x), "\n";
    }
}
$process = fork { sub => 'square_root', child_fh => 'in,out,block' };
$process->write_stdin("81\n");
$result = $process->read_stdout(); #  =>  "9\n"

Both the multiprocessing module and Forks::Super have a lot of features. Which ones are you specifically interested in?

I am the author of Forks::Super and my goal is to include any features for parallel processing that people find useful, so if there's a feature in multiprocessing that you want in Perl, let me know.

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This is just what I was looking for. I got this task to add parallelism to improve running times on some Perl scripts we have. I had used Python's multiprocessing before, but nothing like that in Perl. I'll have more specific questions as I start to convert the scripts. –  jkysam Oct 28 '11 at 17:50

forks provides the same awesome interface as threads, but uses processes instead of threads.

use forks;  # Or: use threads;
use Thread::Queue;

my $q = Thread::Queue->new();

my @workers;
for (1..NUM_WORKERS) {
   push @workers, async {
      while (defined(my $job = $q->dequeue())) {
         ...
      }
   };
}

$q->enqueue(...);

$q->enqueue(undef) for @workers;
$_->join for @workers;

Comparing forks with Forks::Super.

Keep in mind, these are suppose to the be the cases where Forks::Super excels!

use Forks::Super;
sub do_something { my @args = @_; ... }
$process = fork { sub => \&do_something, args => [@args] };
$process->wait;

can be written as

use forks;
sub do_something { my @args = @_; ... }
$process = async { do_something(@args) };
$process->join;

---

use Forks::Super;
my $x = 42;
my @y = ();
my %z = ();
sub do_something_else {
    $x = 19;
    @y = qw(foo bar);
    %z = (foo => 'bar');
}
$process = fork { sub => 'do_something_else', share => [\$x, \@y, \%z ] };
$process->wait;

can be written as

use forks;
use forks::shared;
my $x :shared = 42;
my @y :shared = ();
my %z :shared = ();
sub do_something_else {
    $x = 19;
    @y = qw(foo bar);
    %z = (foo => 'bar');
}
$process = async { do_something_else() };
$process->join;

---

use Forks::Super;
use IO::Handle;
pipe my $child_read, my $parent_write;
pipe my $parent_read, my $child_write;
$parent_write->autoflush(1);
$child_write->autoflush(1);
sub square {
    while (my $x = <$child_read>) {
        chomp($x);
        print {$child_write} $x ** 2, "\n";
    }
    close $child_write;
}
$process = fork { sub => 'square' };
print { $parent_write } "9\n";
chomp( my $result = <$parent_read> );  # 81
close $parent_write;
$process->wait;

can be written as

use forks;
use Threads::Queue;
my $req = Threads::Queue->new();
my $resp = Threads::Queue->new();
sub square { $_[0] ** 2 }
$process = async {
    while (defined(my $x = $req->dequeue())) {
        $resp->enqueue( square($x) );
    }
};
$req->enqueue(9);
my $result = $resp->dequeue();  # 81
$resp->enqueue(undef);
$process->join;

---

use Forks::Super;
sub square_root {
    sleep 1 && seek STDIN,0,1 while eof(STDIN); # ok, this is a workaround for an existing bug :-(
    while (my $x = <STDIN>) {
        chomp($x);
        print sqrt($x), "\n";
    }
}
$process = fork { sub => 'square_root', child_fh => 'in,out,block' };
$process->write_stdin("81\n");
chomp( $result = $process->read_stdout() );  # 9
$process->close_fh('stdin');
$process->wait;

can be written as

use forks;
use Threads::Queue;
my $req = Threads::Queue->new();
my $resp = Threads::Queue->new();
$process = async {
    while (defined(my $x = $req->dequeue())) {
        $resp->enqueue( sqrt($x) );
    }
};
$req->enqueue(81);
my $result = $resp->dequeue();  # 9
$resp->enqueue(undef);
$process->join;
share|improve this answer
    
@jkysam, Added comparison of forks and Forks::Super. –  ikegami Oct 29 '11 at 0:26

What about POE: Perl Object Environment? It has support for asynchronous child processes.

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