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I have some processing I want to do on thousands of files simultaneously. Grab the first byte of all the files and do something, go to the next byte, etc. The files could be any size, so loading them all into memory could be prohibitive.

I'm concerned that due to limitations in operating system file descriptors, just naively opening thousands of files and reading them in seems like I might run into issues.

But cycling through and opening/closing files would be rather inefficient, I imagine.

Is there some efficient mechanism to handle what I'm trying to do?

NOTE: this function may be distributed to use machines that I would have no control over, so I can't just go changing settings on the OS.

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I want to do on thousands of files simultaneously. Grab the first byte of all the files and do something, go to the next byte, etc.

Are these files small enough that you could read them all into memory at once. If so, then read the files one at a time, then process all the files a byte at a time.

I'm concerned that due to limitations in operating system file descriptors, just naively opening thousands of files and reading them in seems like I might run into issues.

You might. The only way to find out is to try.

But cycling through and opening/closing files would be rather inefficient, I imagine.

Yes it would. But if you can't read all the files into memory, and your operating system can't open thousands of files at a time, then this is your last resort.

What you can do is find out the limit of simultaneous open files that your system can handle. Let's just say for the sake of discussion that your system can open 100 files at a time, and you have 2,500 files to process.

Then your process would look something like this.

  • Open the first 100 files.
  • Write an output file that contains the first byte from the 100 files, then the second byte from the 100 files, and so on.
  • Handle any problems you might encounter if the 100 files are not of the same byte length.

Now, after running this process through all your files, you'll have 25 intermediate files.

Then your second process would look something like this.

  • Open the 25 intermediate files.
  • Process the first 100 bytes from each file.

You would determine the actual numbers (simultaneous files open, number of intermediate files) through experimentation or research on your operating system.

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So, in other words, "no". :) Your workaround suggestion is useful, and you could do it to a single file since you can skip bytes in writing and fill them in with the next batch. But... if the set of files is dynamic--writing out a new combined file every time might take longer than the worst case of opening/closing each file to get one byte. –  taotree Oct 28 '11 at 17:06
    
@taotree: There's no way I can answer that without running an experiment. If the set of files is dynamic, you have a worse problem in that you have to keep track of the byte position you're interested in, and read all the way to that byte position to get to the byte you're interested in. Using the intermediate method on 2,500 files, you have 2,525 file opens and closes for however many bytes you retrieve. Opening and closing 2,500 files for every byte you want, especially since it won't be the first byte, will probably have a higher input / output cost. –  Gilbert Le Blanc Oct 28 '11 at 17:17
    
Sorry, of course you'd load chunks at a time--I wrote that comment wrong. Anyway... the question was whether there was some way to really do it but so far, the answer appears to be no. So, I'll have to do some type of workaround. –  taotree Oct 28 '11 at 18:20

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