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Is it possible to call base class function without modifying both base and derived classes?

class Employee {
    public String getName() {
        return "Employee";
    }

    public int getSalary() {
        return 5000;
    }
}

class Manager extends Employee {
    public int getBonus() {
        return 1000;
    }

    public int getSalary() {
        return 6000;
    }
}

class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Employee em = new Manager();
        System.out.println(em.getName());
        // System.out.println(em.getBonus());
        System.out.println(((Manager) em).getBonus());
        System.out.println(em.getSalary());
    }
}

Output: Employee 1000 6000

How shall I call the Employee's getSalary() method on em object?

share|improve this question
    
Seems like duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/784542/…. – Jiri Oct 28 '11 at 17:01
    
@Jiri, thanks. Actually I searched but don't know how I missed it. – John Oct 29 '11 at 3:52
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can't. You could add a method like this to Manager if you wanted:

public int getEmployeeSalary()
{
    return super.getSalary();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Why do you want a getEmployeeSalary() method on Manager? That seems wrong... – Puce Oct 28 '11 at 17:07
2  
I don't; the original poster wanted to get the value returned by that method. Perhaps Employee and Manager are just example classes here, and we're really speaking in more general terms about calling overridden methods. – Ernest Friedman-Hill Oct 28 '11 at 17:13
1  
In more general terms the OP wants to break polymorphism, which is just wrong. In this case the obvious missing piece is the many-many association between manager and employee. – Perception Oct 28 '11 at 17:20
    
I'm pretty sure these are just examples, but rather than being "the salary his employees make" it could also be "the salary he'd get if he wasn't a manager", and in that case in theory this is a legitimate thing to want to do. But the decision is, and should be, up to the implementor of Manager, not to some random client, which is why there's no way to do it without that implementor's cooperation. – Ernest Friedman-Hill Oct 28 '11 at 17:22
    
So finally it is not possible to do it without changing the Manager class!! But as pointed out, I would be breaking polymorphism. I asked out of curiosity. – John Oct 28 '11 at 17:47

Use an Employee object instead:

Employee em = new Employee();
share|improve this answer
    
I want to use the existing em object. – John Oct 29 '11 at 3:50

You can call the superclass's method from within the subclass.

class Manager extends Employee {
    public int getBonus() {
    return 1000;
    }

    public int getSalary() {
    return super.getSalary();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please read my question. It's without changing Employee or Manager code. – John Oct 29 '11 at 3:51

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