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Consider the following class structure:

public class Foo<T>
{
    public virtual void DoSomething()
    {
    }

    public class Bar<U> where U : Foo<T>, new()
    {
        public void Test()
        {
            var blah = new U();
            blah.DoSomething();
        }
    }
}

public class Baz
{
}

public class FooBaz : Foo<Baz>
{
    public override void DoSomething()
    {
    }
}

When I go to use the nested class, I have something like the following:

var x = new FooBaz.Bar<FooBaz>();

It seems redundant to have to specify it twice. How would I create my class structure such that I can do this instead:

var x = new FooBaz.Bar();

Shouldn't there be some way on the where clause of the nested class to say that U is always the parent? How?


Update: Added methods for DoSomething() above to address some of the comments. It's important that when I call DoSomething, it addresses the overridden version. If I just use Foo instead of U, then the base implementation is called instead.

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How do you use U inside Bar? Wouldn't using Foo<T> instead suffice? –  svick Oct 28 '11 at 17:26
    
IMO Best thing you can do is what you doing now. –  Saeed Amiri Oct 28 '11 at 17:26
    
Foo<T> does not suffice because I may have overridden methods in FooBaz. If Bar just refers to Foo<T>, it uses the base implementation in Foo<T>. –  Matt Johnson Oct 28 '11 at 17:33
    
If you have overridden methods, that means you also have an instance of Foo<T> and that means using Foo<T> as the type should work. If FooBaz overrides some methods, those are the ones that will be called. That's how virtual methods work. –  svick Oct 28 '11 at 18:10
    
If you say "new Foo<T>()", you do not automatically get a FooBaz just because one is defined. I'll update the question with some methods so you can see. –  Matt Johnson Oct 28 '11 at 18:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If class Bar does not need to be generic, why do you make it one?

This would work:

public class Foo<T, U> where U : Foo<T, U>
{     
    public class Bar
    {
        private T t;
        private U u;
    }
}

public class Baz
{
}

public class FooBaz : Foo<Baz, FooBaz>
{
}

And then

var bar = new FooBaz.Bar();

Of course all of this is totally abstract, so it might or might not apply to a practical example. What exactly are you trying to achieve here?

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When U is not useful in container class why pass it as generic parameter? –  Saeed Amiri Oct 28 '11 at 17:26
    
@SaeedAmiri: Because it may be useful (I added fields of types T and U to hint towards this). How do you know that it's not? –  Jon Oct 28 '11 at 17:27
    
Ok, this might work, but I'm not sure about the recursion going on in the definition of FooBaz. I'll try it out. –  Matt Johnson Oct 28 '11 at 17:46
    
Ok, this does indeed work. But it's just a tradeoff of moving the redundant type specification to the parent class instead of the child. I have many more of Foo than Bar, so I guess I will leave it as I originally showed. Basically, this solution asks the same question, but of SELF rather than PARENT. Thanks anyway. –  Matt Johnson Oct 28 '11 at 17:53
    
@Jon, if it is useful OP should add them in container class not you. we just can judge about what we can see –  Saeed Amiri Oct 28 '11 at 18:16

Why do you introduce U at all? Can you not replace its use everywhere within the definition of Bar with Foo<T>?

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Again, no. Using Foo<T> does not suffice because I may have overridden methods in FooBaz. If Bar just refers to Foo<T>, it uses the base implementation in Foo<T>. –  Matt Johnson Oct 28 '11 at 17:44
    
Ok, this was not clear to me from the initial question. Hence I asked why you introduced U. –  Frank Oct 28 '11 at 17:57

No, you can't merge that.

Inside Foo you have T and U, 2 different types and the compiler cannot make up a type for U, only constrain it.

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This is where I wish StackOverflow could let me pick two accepted answers. This is indeed true. Jon's answer has a bit more detail though. Thanks anyway. –  Matt Johnson Oct 28 '11 at 17:55

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