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Context: I need to write some tree-matching rules for an abstract-syntax tree.

I would like a clean-ish way of, for example, matching if a numeric-literal index (rather than symbolic) is given for an array access.

Consider that I have an abstract class (ie. has pure a virtual function), lvalue. lvalue is subclassed to only 2 concrete classes, variable and array_element.

To handle these two cases differently, I could apply apply the visitor pattern (but I would consider it overkill here) or use an ugly mess of dynamic_cast's. (I already use the visitor pattern to traverse my AST and CFG)

void main() {
    lvalue *lv = new variable("foo");
    // ... somehow do a tree-pattern matching on lv
}

To check if lv was an array-access with a literal (ie. constant) index, I can certainly write the following:

if (array_element *ae = dynamic_cast<array_element*>(lv)) {
   if (dynamic_cast<constant*>(ae->index)) {
      cout << "Yes, lv is an array-access and indexed by a literal" << endl;
   }
}

... but this is damn ugly and unmaintainable. A step in the right direction would be the following (if only it worked):

void func(variable *n) {
    cout << "got a variable" << endl;
}

void func(array_element *n) {
    cout << "got a array" << endl;
}

Is there any way to avoid the mess of dynamic_cast's? Please advise :)

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1  
You may want to look at what LLVM does. It requires some plumbing and it's still a workaround, but the resulting matching code is probably the cleanest you'll get (without terrible abuse of the preprocessor). – delnan Oct 28 '11 at 17:58

This might be dependent on your actual context... I'm sure your real code is doing something more interesting than

cout << "Yes, lv is an array-access and indexed by a literal" << endl;

But I think the simplest suggestion is to use plain-old polymorphism. That is, where the visitor pattern is an attempt to emulate double-dispatch, all you really need (I think) is single-dispatch. The obvious start is something like:

struct lvalue {
    virtual void policy() = 0;
};

struct variable : public lvalue {
    virtual void policy() { /* whatever */ }
};

struct array_element : public lvalue {
    virtual void policy() {
        cout << "Yes, lv is an array-access and indexed by a literal" << endl;
    }
};

But I'm sure that's something you'd have figured out already :P You could also consider adding a level of indirection:

// interface for a "policy" class.  this could look however you want it to.
struct lvalue_policy {
    virtual void operator()() = 0;
};

struct lvalue {
    virtual lvalue_policy policy() = 0;
};

// variables
struct variable_policy : public lvalue_policy {
    virtual void operator()() { /* whatever */ }
};

struct variable : public lvalue {
    virtual variable_policy policy() { return variable_policy; }
};

// array elements
struct array_element_policy : public lvalue_policy {
    virtual void operator()() {
        cout << "Yes, lv is an array-access and indexed by a literal" << endl;
    }
};

struct array_element : public lvalue {
    virtual array_element_policy policy() { return array_element_policy; }
};

... But I'm not sure that really buys you anything over the simpler direct approach. The issue I think both of them have is inflexibility with the return type of policy() -- they both boil down to void returns. Again, this might be fine for your situation, but my bias is always towards compile-time polymorphism when possible, because it gives you substantially greater flexibility with types. So the solution I'd try if I were you is something more like this:

template class lvalue<typename T, typename policyT> {
    policyT m_policy; // assume this has an operator() that returns T
public:
    T policy() { return m_policy(); }
};
share|improve this answer

C++ isn't a good language for doing pattern matching with such surface syntax patterns; at best you'll have to write complicated visitors with all kinds of checking that knows the structure of the AST.

You might consider using a tool that is designed to AST transformations, e.g., a source-to-source Program Transformation" tool. Most of these will let you write some kind of surface syntax pattern used to enable a rewrite, a rule of the form of "if you see this syntax, replace it by that syntax".

Now, most such tools require that you somehow define the language you want to manipulate to the tool, so it knows what that syntax is. You don't say which language you want to manipulate; your SO C++ tag seems to be there because you want to do this in C++. I can't help you with this part :-{ It wouldn't surprise me if you wanted to manipulate C++ since that's what you are coding in, but that's just a guess. But if you are going to use a program transformation tool, you need a robust language definition, and those are hard to obtain. A good definition of C++ for this purpose is extremely hard to obtain, especially with C++11 now out.

Our DMS Software Reengineering Toolkit with its C++ Front End would be able to do this for C++. DMS provides parsing to ASTs, procedural access to the AST (as you were doing in your C++ program, but more important, this notion of source patterns.

For your specific task, you could use the following DMS pattern.

 domain Cpp~gcc4;

 pattern numeric_literal_index(v: identifier, n: numeric_literal):lhs
    " \v[\n] ";

The language and dialect are specified by the domain declaration. In this case the language is C++ (spelled obviously Cpp here), and the dialect is gcc4 (DMS can handle a variety of C++ dialects).

The pattern is named (because we often have many patterns and rules) *numeric_literal_index*. The pattern is parameterized by an identifier (this is a C++ grammar token) and numeric_literal (likewise, but this is a grammar nonterminal that allows any of the zillion C++ numeric literal types) because we want to match 1, 3L, etc. The pattern is constrained to match an lhs (a C++ grammar nonterminal) although in practice this won't match anything else due to its syntax. The actual pattern is enclosed in metaquotes "..." which isolate the C++ specific syntax from the surround sea of pattern language syntax.

With this pattern, a DMS call can be made to match this pattern against a tree node. A match will return pointers to the identifier AST node, and the numeric_literal tree node.

Of course, one can write much more complex patterns, and even rewrite rules using this. A moral: use the right tool for the job.

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I'm not even sure it is doable in C or C++, because pattern matching involve pattern variables , and there is no simple way to have them in C or C++ (unless you are coding an interpreter in C++ for a language having patterns, in which case you have some representations of environments, and you need a standard unification routine to do the match).

If you need patterns inside your C++ code, I would suggest making a C++ code generator which translate your patterns [expressed in your domain specific language] into C++ code.

I've done the equivalent for C (translating patterns, with pattern variables, from MELT to C) in GCC MELT, a domain specific language (with match & patterns) to extend the GCC compiler.

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Yuriy Solodkyy is currently developing a C++11 library called Mach7 that provides a switch-like statement to do this. His slides and papers on type switching and pattern matching (co-authored with Gabriel Dos Reis and Bjarne Stroustrup) give details on performance and implementation.

It lets you do simple switching over types, which provides an alternative to the visitor pattern.

Match(lv)
{
    Case(array_element)
        cout << "array_element" << endl;
    ...
}

Impressively, it also lets you do more complicated pattern matching similar to ML or Haskell:

Match(lv)
{
  Case(C<array_element>(C<constant>(index)))
      cout << "Yes, lv is an array-access and indexed by a literal" << endl;
  ...
}

See also Thomas Petit's answer to Skeen's related question about doing ML-style pattern matching in C++.

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