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Why is AJAX called asynchronous? How does it accomplish communication asynchronously with the server?

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up vote 16 down vote accepted

It's asynchronous in that it doesn't lock up the browser. If you fire an Ajax request, the user can still work while the request is waiting for a response. When the server returns the response, a callback runs to handle it.

You can make the XMLHttpRequest synchronous if you want, and if you do, the browser locks up while the request is outstanding (so most of the time this is inappropriate)

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-1 Asynchronous means "not at the same time". You didn't explain what was "not at the same time" about AJAX. Your answer makes it sound like you can work at the same time as the call, so therefore it is called asynchronous, which makes no sense grammatically. – gcdev Feb 13 '15 at 18:24

It's asynchronous because the client and the server run independently of each other for the duration of the function call.

During a normal function call, you make the call, and the calling function doesn't get to execute again until the function call finishes and returns. The caller and the callee are always synchronized.

During an asynchronous function call, you make the call, and then control returns immediately to the caller. The callee then returns a value some indeterminate amount of time later. That "indeterminate amount of time" means the caller and callee are no longer synchronized, so it's asynchronous.

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Thank you -- I finally understand what exactly is considered "synchronous" and "asynchronous"! It has always puzzled me that when you run two AJAX calls at the same time (synchronized) they are called "asynchronous". You explained it nicely. – gcdev Feb 13 '15 at 18:25

Simply put, it does not need to reload the whole page to get new information. Think of a email client. You would not need to refresh the page to see new emails. Ajax just pulls the server every couple of minutes to see if there are new emails, if so display them

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IMHO this answer gives a wrong picture of what AJAX, and asynchrony in general, is. Neither AJAX nor asynchrony are equal to simple repeated polling to prevent the user from having to refresh a page manually. Asynchrony is about not blocking (e.g. not blocking further page/script processing while some resource request is pending). This answer is correct in the sense that apart from just asynchrony, AJAX also makes it possible to load new data and update the current page without loading a completely new page. – stakx Dec 5 '14 at 20:49

I.e. not "blocking", within the context of Javascript execution, as the response will be handled by an event loop.

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. - From Review – Jon Surrell Dec 2 '15 at 9:43

The client and the server run independently of each other for the duration of the function call.

Normal function call - you make the call, and the calling function doesn't get to execute again until the function call finishes and returns. The caller and the callee are always synchronized.

Asynchronous function call - you make the call, and then control returns immediately to the caller. The callee then returns a value some undefined amount of time later. That "undefined amount of time" means the caller and callee are no longer synchronized, so it's asynchronous.

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