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Is O(n) considered as faster compared to O(n log n)? If I have a function that does a loop, which is O(n) then a merge sort outside the loop O(n log n) then the run time would be O(n log n) I assume?

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Is there a typo in your question? It's unclear what the O(n log n) bit is. –  Dusty Oct 28 '11 at 17:47
    
sorry, I made the question a bit clear –  xonegirlz Oct 28 '11 at 17:49

5 Answers 5

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Is O(n) considered as faster compared to O(n log n)?

No, not directly. Big-O notation is about the limiting factor in an algorithm, which has more to do with an algorithms scalability than speed. You can have a routine that's O(1) which takes longer than a routine of O(n^2) for a specific set of data - but the former will scale much better.

That being said, in general, O(n) will of course scale better than O(n log n), and would likely be considered "faster" or "better".

If I have a function that does a loop, which is O(n) the a O(n log n) then the run time would be O(n log n) I assume?

It's unclear exactly what you're saying here -

If you mean you have a loop with 2 functions, ie:

Loop over N elements
    - Call O(n) function
    - Call O(n log n) function

Then the overall limiting factor is going to be O(n^2 log n).

(From Comment)

I mean the merge sort (n log n) is outside the loop, so still it would be O(n log n)

If, instead, you're saying you're going to do something like:

- Call O(n log n) function
- Loop over N elements
     - Process each element using O(1) algorithm

Then the overall complexity is still O(n log n), as that is the limiting factor. This is because "O(n + n)" is still O(n).

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O(n) is asymptotically "better" or "faster" than O(n log n), yes. If you have a function that does a loop, and the loop body calls an O(n log n) function n times, the overall complexity is O(n^2 log n)... unless I misinterpret your question. In other words, doing an O(n log n) thing n times results in O(n * n log n) = O(n^2 log n) complexity.

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I mean the merge sort (n log n) is outside the loop, so still it would be O(n log n) –  xonegirlz Oct 28 '11 at 17:48
    
@xonegirlz: Could you post some code so that I understand what you're saying? Sorry for being dense. –  Patrick87 Oct 28 '11 at 17:51

O(n * log n) is of course more than O(n).

O(n * n * log n) > O(n * n) > O(n * log n) > O(n) > O(1)

And so on.

O(n + 1) = O(n)

O(2 * n) = O(n)

O(n + log n) = O(n)

O(n + n * log n) = O(n * log n) and this is your case.

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O(N) is asymptotically "faster" as N approaches infinity -- but for any finite value of N may be slower, faster or equal.

I'm not quite sure what you're asking in your second sentence. If you mean that part of an algorithm is proportional to N log N, and another to N, then yes, big-O says you ignore the other parts as long as they're added to the main one, not multiplied by it.

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As n becomes larger, log n increases without bound. This means:

  • O(log n) > O(1), so O(log n + 1) = O(log n)
  • O(n log n + n) = O(n (log n + 1)) = O(n log n)

The whole idea of O() notation is to simplify your runtime formulas by ignoring everything but the largest component.

On the other hand, it also allows you to ignore constant factors in your larger component. So, just because an algorithm is asymptotically faster for large problems, does not mean that it is actually faster for any particular problem...

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