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EDIT: See GWW's answer, the problem was simply making an illicit copy with C::Instance(). And I was wrong, the error does not depend on mutable.

Are static methods incompatible with mutable methods? Here's a simplified version of my code:

c.h:

class C 
{
    public:
        static C& Instance();
    private:
        C();

        mutable QMutex _mutex; 
};

c.cpp:

C& C::Instance() 
{
    static C instance;
    return instance; 
} 
C c = C::Instance();

Then the error I'm getting (gcc 4.2) is

error: 'QMutex::QMutex(const QMutex&)' is private within this context

synthesized method 'C::C(const C&)' first required here //at C::Instance()

If I remove the 'mutable' keyword this error goes away, but then of course I can't make the methods that lock/unlock _mutex const. Writing my own copy ctor doesn't change anything. Anyone know how to solve this? NB this looks similar to this post but that's objective-C and there was just too much code in there that didn't seem relevant to the question.

EDIT: Just realized that the problem, obviously, is that QMutex's copy ctor is private. But I don't understand why 'mutable' should make a difference here, i.e. why it induces a copy.

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C c = C::Instance(); will copy the instance? Are you sure that's what you want to do? –  GWW Oct 28 '11 at 19:55
    
@GWW Oh LOL you are right! blush –  Matt Phillips Oct 28 '11 at 20:01
    
So the question boils down to: how does mutable affect the public/private nature of the compiler generated copy constructor? –  Mark Ransom Oct 28 '11 at 20:02
    
@Mark Ok I double-checked and actually I do get the same error, just hadn't seen it the first time. Deleting this question. –  Matt Phillips Oct 28 '11 at 20:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are trying to copy your singleton and it fails because you have declared a copy constructor private. It has absolutely nothing to do with mutable members.

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2  
C & c = C::Instance(); will probably fix that –  GWW Oct 28 '11 at 19:58

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