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SAMPLE CODE:

public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
private void OnPropertyChanged(String propertyName) 
{ 
    PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged; 
    if (handler != null) 
    {
        handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
    }
}

VS:

public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
private void OnPropertyChanged(String propertyName) 
{ 
    if (PropertyChanged!= null) 
    {
        PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
    }
}

Why is it that I always see people creating assigning PropertyChanged to a "handler" instead of just using it?

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2 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

If you do it the simpler way, and a different thread removes the last handler from the event just inside your if, you'll get a null reference. (delegates are immutable)

By making a handler temporary, you prevent this, since you only check the field once.

If the event will never be unsubscribed to from multiple threads, you don't need the temporary.

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I'm a bad coder then. Did you ever actually see this happen? :) Seriously, I wouldn't like to add another compulsion to my list if it's such scenario never occurs like I think it doesn't :) –  Nikola Radosavljević Oct 28 '11 at 20:26
1  
@Nikola It happens, and can happen easily, in multithreaded code. That being said, it's easy to write code that completely avoids the issue (1st cast), so why not prevent the problem from occurring? –  Reed Copsey Oct 28 '11 at 20:30
    
@Reed, I'm aware this can theoretically happen, I just think that chances are slim to nil to have such horrific code that adds/removes event handlers at a spectacular rate in several threads that would give sufficient probability of threads being switched at just the right moment :) Anyway, there's another nice way to get around that problem: private event EventHandler SomethingHappend = delegate { }; –  Nikola Radosavljević Oct 28 '11 at 20:46
    
@Nikola That's reducing efficiency, and not as safe, as you can remove that event handler... I've had this happen, in real production code. It's also not always the easiest to debug. –  Reed Copsey Oct 28 '11 at 20:49
2  
@Nikola: And also: * I just think that chances are slim to nil to have such horrific code that adds/removes event handlers at a spectacular rate in several threads that would give sufficient probability of threads being switched at just the right moment* - You must not write a lot of multithreaded code then. That's called a race condition and it happens all the time. –  Ed S. Oct 28 '11 at 21:05
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Did you ever actually see this happen?

Sure, this takes a fraction of second to bomb on my machine after starting it:

using System;
using System.Threading;

class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        EventHandler anEvent = null;
        var t1 = ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem((w) => {
            for (; ; ) {
                anEvent += Test;
                anEvent -= Test;
            }
        });
        var t2 = ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem((w) => {
            for (; ; ) {
                if (anEvent != null) anEvent(null, null);
            }
        });
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    static void Test(object sender, EventArgs e) { }
}

It is a quick crash due to the relentlessly quick looping. In a real app this takes anywhere between a day and a year to crash. The odds that you'll catch it while debugging your code are very slim. If it does happen you'll go, "wtf? Let's try again" and not get it again.

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