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Even though the solution is so obvious I should have never have posted this, I'm leaving it up as a reminder and a useful point of reference to others.

I've got the following base class:

using System;

namespace LibraryWPF
{
    public class Library
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Event fired when content is added to the libary
        /// </summary>
        public event EventHandler<ObjectInfoEventArgs> Library_ObjectAdded;

        /// <summary>
        /// Event fired when the scan of the library is finished
        /// </summary>
        public event EventHandler Library_Finished;

        // Properties

        /// <summary>
        /// Whether to stop checking the library or not
        /// </summary>
        public bool Stop
        {
            get;
            set;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Where to look for content
        /// </summary>
        public string Root
        {
            get;
            set;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Empty instance of library's object for reflection
        /// </summary>
        public virtual object ObjectInfo
        {
            get
            {
                // Should this raise as exception to show if it's not been overridden?
                return null;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Sub class overrides this method to call it's actual find code
        /// </summary>
        public virtual void Find()
        {
            // Should this raise as exception to show if it's not been overridden?
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Build the library
        /// </summary>
        public void Build()
        {
            if (Root != null && Root.Length > 0)
            {
                Stop = false;
                Find();
            }

            // Final update
            if (Library_Finished != null)
            {
                Library_Finished(this, null);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Sub class calls this method to fire the ObjectAdded event
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="objectInfo">Object just added to library</param>
        protected void OnObjectAdded(object objectInfo)
        {
            if (Library_ObjectAdded != null)
            {
                Library_ObjectAdded(this, new ObjectInfoEventArgs(objectInfo));
            }
        }
    }
}

The sub-classes override ObjectInfo to return an instance of the type of object they're looking for use by reflection. They also override Find to do the actual searching.

This way my application code can use the base class methods so it doesn't have to know anything about the sub-classes at compile time. I tell it what sort of content to look for using DI.

So - my question is this:

Should I throw an exception in the base class versions of ObjectInfo and Find so that if the sub-classes aren't implemented properly I get a run-time error? Or should I code for ObjectInfo returning null?

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I can't believe I completely forgot about making the methods abstract. –  ChrisF Apr 27 '09 at 14:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

If you require that a method be implemented by derived classes, why not make it abstract instead of virtual? This will force the derived class to implement the member. If they do not want to, or cannot return an ObjectInfo they can choose to return null themselves.

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1  
+1 For making the methods abstract. –  Andrew Hare Apr 27 '09 at 13:52
1  
Thanks - that's what I was thinking of but couldn't remember the term - why I don't know :) –  ChrisF Apr 27 '09 at 14:21

You should declare your base class and the methods to be implemented by derived classes as abstract. This avoids the probem entirely because the compiler will detect derived classes that don't override all abstarct methods.

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You certainly can do that but exceptions usually indicate execution-time errors, not implementation errors.

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Which is why I asked the question really. –  ChrisF Apr 27 '09 at 14:21

I think there are cases wich the property is optional, where you should have a property: ObjectInfo and a boolean "SupportObjectInfo".

In that case, you mark the ObjectInfo property just virtual and throw a NotSupportedException.

You do so, because the consumers of your class can test if it has support to that property, and don´t have to catch the error for testing.

If, in the implementation, it is not optional, you should mark it as abstract.

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If you would like to "protect" the callers of the base class from receiving potentially unanticipated exceptions thrown by classes derived from your base class, consider using the Template pattern to catch any errors thrown by the derived class and convert them to an exception that you define on the base class. You should also consider passing up the exception thrown by the derived class as an inner exception.

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