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I have found myself using JavaScript and I ran across childNodes and children properties. I am wondering what the difference between them is. Also is one preferred to the other?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 79 down vote accepted

.children is a property of an Element. Only Elements have children, and these children are all of type Element.

However .childNodes is a property of Node. .childNodes can contain any node.

So a concrete example would be

var el = document.createElement("div");
el.textContent = "foo"
el.childNodes.length === 1; // TextNode is a node child
el.children.length === 0; // no Element children

Of course .children is DOM4 so browser support is shaky, however if you use the DOM-shim, your cross browser problems will go away!

Most of the time you want to use .children because generally you don't want to loop over TextNodes or Comments in your DOM manipulation.

If you do want to manipulate TextNodes you probably want .textContent instead.

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3  
Yeah, IE seems to have some problems: quirksmode.org/dom/w3c_core.html#t71 –  Felix Kling Oct 28 '11 at 23:12
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Children can be any type, not just HTML elements –  david Oct 29 '11 at 1:24
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@david what? "matching only element children." children can only be elements –  Raynos Oct 29 '11 at 9:31
    
@Raynos my mistake confusing DOM 1 where element.childNodes[0] would of been first child in the list of children nodes –  david Oct 29 '11 at 10:36
    
@david there is confusion between the term "children" which is any child node and the getter .children as defined on Element. yes it's annoying. I agree. (blame IE!) –  Raynos Oct 29 '11 at 11:23

Element.children returns only element children, while Node.childNodes returns all node children. Note that elements are nodes, so both are available on elements.

I believe childNodes is more reliable. For example, MDC (linked above) notes that IE only got children right in IE 9. childNodes provides less room for error by browser implementors.

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1  
Darn, if only this worked on IE 6-8, it would be a dream come true. –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Oct 28 '11 at 23:05
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@minitech it does work (for some value of work). Apparently .children doesn't filter out comment nodes, but it filters out text nodes. –  Raynos Oct 28 '11 at 23:16
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@Raynos: Exactly - same with .getElementsByTagName('*'). IE can be so annoying sometimes... –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Oct 28 '11 at 23:17

children will return the immediate child elements, while childNodes will return all the child nodes, deep nested too, and text as well.

Check the jsFiddle example: http://jsfiddle.net/xRqPv/

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7  
No, it will not return nested nodes (which are descendants, not children). Your example (modified) returns a text node, a paragraph, another text, a div, and a final text. If it returned descendants, it would have at least another paragraph. –  Matthew Flaschen Oct 28 '11 at 23:14
    
it is correct that all nodes and text wil be returned by .childNodes, but there can be misunderstanding when stating that "deep" nodes will be returned. i think i understand the meaning of "deep" (comments, texts etc regardless of the index), but NOT nested children (childNodes of childNodes), which is wrong –  Nikos M. Oct 5 at 21:23

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