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Suppose I had a 1-by-12 matrix and I wanted to resize it to a 4-by-3 matrix. How could I do this?

My current solution is kind of ugly:

for n = 1:(length(mat)/3)
    out(n,1:3) = mat( ((n-1)*3 + 1):((n-1)*3 + 3) );
end

Is there a better way to do this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 19 down vote accepted

reshape is of course the proper solution, as stated by gnovice.

A nice feature of reshape is that it allows this:

A = 1:12;
B = reshape(A,4,[]);
B =
     1     5     9
     2     6    10
     3     7    11
     4     8    12

So if you ddon't know how many columns there will be, reshape will compute it for you. Likewise, reshape will fill in the number of rows, if you leave that out.

C = reshape(A,[],4)
C =
     1     4     7    10
     2     5     8    11
     3     6     9    12
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2  
+1: Nice! I actually never noticed that before. I guess I never had to use it. –  gnovice Apr 27 '09 at 14:16

Try the RESHAPE function:

A = (1-by-12 matrix);
B = reshape(A,4,3);

Note that the matrix B will be filled with elements from A in a columnwise fashion (i.e. columns will be filled from top to bottom, moving left to right).

Example:

>> A = 1:12;
>> B = reshape(A,4,3)

B =

     1     5     9
     2     6    10
     3     7    11
     4     8    12
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Note that the reshape returns an error if A doesn't have exactly 4*3 elements. –  AnnaR Apr 27 '09 at 14:02
    
Yes, that is the normal expected behavior of RESHAPE. –  gnovice Apr 27 '09 at 14:04
    
Can't we tell RESHAPE to add zeros if there are no exactly 4*3 elements? I meant if there are less than 12 elements. –  Nadeeshani Jayathilake Apr 28 '11 at 6:16
    
@Nadeeshani: No, but you can do this instead: A = 1:11; B = zeros(4,3); B(1:numel(A)) = A; –  gnovice Apr 28 '11 at 15:55

to extend gnovice's solution:

If you need a different order of matrix construction, use transpose (the ' operator) or permute() to change the dimension ordering after you have called reshape().

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+1: Good point about transposing and PERMUTE. These are sometimes needed after a reshape. –  gnovice Apr 27 '09 at 14:10

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