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Really like objectify, although still struggling with what is the best way to structure my data in my app. I will be launching a new app soon and do not want to get stuck with a structure that may not function right, or would perform very slowly.

The app will be on the HRD and will have a large number of entity types. For illustrative purposes I will make up some example entities. Suppose the app is for fast food restaurants. Each chain will be an entity(for example McDonalds, Wendy's, etc.). Each specific franchise or location will be an entity as well. Employees, Orders, Menus, Timesheets, and so on will also be entities.

I guess by biggest question is how to setup the relationships between these entities? I have been store relationships by storing the datastore ID as a long in each entity. For example each employee entity would have a long value that is the datastore ID for the location they work at, as well as for which chain they are a member of.

With this structure I can query for all of the orders from a specific restaurant with a statement such as:

  Long restaurantId =restaurant.getId();
  Query<Order> q=ofy.query(Order.class).filter("location", resturantId);

Just curious if there is any issue with using the datastore/objectify in this manner. Any input would be great! I have been using something similar on a small scale and seems to work fine. Ideally I would like the most efficient structure, and i realize this may take some testing. However once may app is deployed it may be very difficult to change...

@Entity
public class Chain {

  @Id
  @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY)
  private Long id;

  private String name;
  private String type;

  //getters & setters, etc
  }

@Entity
public class Location {

  @Id
  @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY)
  private Long id;

  private Long chain;  //which resturant chain the location belongs to (mcdonalds, wendy's,     etc)

  private String address;
  private String owner;
  private String phoneNumber;

  //getters & setters, etc
  }

@Entity
public class Employee {

  @Id
  @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY)
  private Long id;

  private Long location;  //which location the employee works for
  private Long chain;  //which resturant chain the location belongs to (mcdonalds, wendy's,     etc)

  private String name;
  private String position;

  //getters & setters, etc
  }

@Entity
public class Order {

  @Id
  @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY)
  private Long id;

  private Long chain;  //which resturant chain the location belongs to (mcdonalds, wendy's,     etc)
  private Long location;
  private Long employee; //employee that took order

  private Order order;
  private String time;

   //getters & setters, etc
   }
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is standard practice. Go forth!

Objectify is great - we've been using it for about 6 months and we're very happy with it.

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Good to hear I'm on the right path. With all the documentation on objectify and datastore, it seems like this approach was to simple. I'm not using @ Parent, @ embedded, or any of the more complex things that you can do. Thanks for your input! –  Patrick Nov 1 '11 at 13:42
1  
I wonder if there is an advantage/disadvantage to using Long Ids vs. storing Key<Object>? –  Patrick Nov 4 '11 at 23:38
1  
I'm using Key<Object> myself, but haven't seen any reason to favor one over the other. The only point of @Parent is to make your results highly consistent - if you don't need highly consistent results then there's no point in using it. –  Pixel Elephant Jul 31 '12 at 18:52

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