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The title say it all. After including <csetjmp>, longjmp and jmp_buf are in the std namespace, but setjmpis not. I verified this on MinGW4.5 and MSVC10. After looking into the <csetjmp> header, I could not figure out the reason of this choice. I was always assuming that every <cheader> file is wrapping a <header.h> in the std namespace.

Am I wrong ? What's the rationale behind the setjmp special case ? Please enlighten me !

Note : I'm aware of the issues of misusing setjmp/longjmp in C++.

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Is sigsetjmp() available as a preferred replacement? –  sarnold Oct 28 '11 at 23:39
    
No, I've no sigsetjmp available neither inside and outside the std namespace after including <csetjmp>. –  overcoder Oct 28 '11 at 23:43
    
To disable it, hopefully. But no, macros don't have namespace scope. –  Hans Passant Oct 28 '11 at 23:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

setjmp can be implemented as a macro, so the C++ standard has this to say in 17.6.1.2 [headers]:

Names which are defined as macros in C shall be defined as macros in the C++ standard library, even if C grants license for implementation as functions. [ Note: The names defined as macros in C include the following: assert, offsetof, setjmp, va_arg, va_end, and va_start. —end note ]

In other words, it's a macro.

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Thanks ! But isn't it possible to define an alias like this : # define std::setjmp setjmp ? –  overcoder Oct 28 '11 at 23:47
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@overcoder, no. That isn't a proper macro. –  MSN Oct 29 '11 at 0:06
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@overcoder: It's not possible because a macro name can only be a single identifier. –  Keith Thompson Oct 29 '11 at 1:04
    
Thanks again ! Now it's clearer to me. –  overcoder Oct 29 '11 at 1:17

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