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i'm looking to write a function that will combine this:

mysql_real_escape_string(htmlentities(trim($_POST[''])));

into this:

secFunction($_POST['']);

in order to simplify things. not really sure how to go about writing it though. advice? :)

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1  
It's not very clear what you're after, please provide an example of what you're aiming for. –  Chris Oct 29 '11 at 3:36
    
i just don't want to have to type all that crap every time i secure an input field. so i'd like to combine those 3 functions into 1, to simplify things for myself. –  elev8 Oct 29 '11 at 3:41
    
Yes, it's the "all that crap" that I'm not clear on. I don't see the connection from the first code chunk and the second. –  Chris Oct 29 '11 at 3:42
    
all that crap = "mysql_real_escape_string(htmlentities(trim" –  elev8 Oct 29 '11 at 4:04
    
ah, ok now it clicks. Yeah, go with Clive's answer. –  Chris Oct 29 '11 at 4:12
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3 Answers 3

Do you mean something like this?

function secFunction($string) {
  return mysql_real_escape_string(htmlentities(trim($string)));
}

$clean_string = secFunction($_POST['something']);
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that's exactly what i what i meant. thanks! –  elev8 Oct 29 '11 at 3:46
    
that's exactly what the OP meant yet exactly opposite to what he really need. God bless stackoverflow. –  Your Common Sense Jan 14 '12 at 19:10
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This is the function I like to use for escaping strings for SQL.

function escape($data) {
    $magicQuotes = get_magic_quotes_gpc();

    if(function_exists('mysql_real_escape_string')) {
        if($magicQuotes) {
            $data = stripslashes($data);
        }

        $data = mysql_real_escape_string($data);
    }
    else {
        if(!$magicQuotes) {
            $data = addslashes($data);
        }
    }

    return $data;
}

You can then use it like this:

$myString = isset($_POST['key']) ? escape($_POST['key']) : '';

You could add in htmlentities and trim if you want but I prefer to do that separately.

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oh nice one! gonna try that out =P –  elev8 Oct 29 '11 at 3:47
    
Franky, code should no longer check for magic_quotes. It should be assumed to be off, and anyone who's running a PHP old enough to still have it on deserves the pain of having the code blow up on them. –  Marc B Oct 29 '11 at 3:48
    
@MarcB Can't hurt to check for it. Anyone who's running a PHP old enough to still have it on deserves the ability to escape their strings without magic quotes blowing everything up. –  Sour Lemon Oct 29 '11 at 3:57
    
Maybe so, but they should suffer the pain of stucking with a PHP that old and take it as a sign they should upgrade to something maybe more bronze- or iron- age, rather than stick with their primordial ooze. –  Marc B Oct 29 '11 at 3:59
    
+2 for "primordial ooze" –  elev8 Oct 29 '11 at 4:04
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escaping with mysql_real_escape_string does not prevent injections.

and htmlentities has nothing to do with injections at all.

and these functions sould never be combined.

you have to use some sort of placeholders to prevent injectoins, and such a placeholder have to be of native prepared statements or substituted with data, which was escaped and quoted, because escaping works only for the data enclosed in quotes.

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