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I need some help implementing the Radix sort algorthim in JavaScript.

I found this example online, with the following code, but I don't understand how I call the function since it appears to be tailored for that site:

// Radix sort a (base 2)
// Numbers must be in the range 0 to 2**31 - 1
function radixSort() {
  readArray('i');
  var b0 = new obj();  // Bin for 0 digits
  var b1 = new obj();  // Bin for 1 digits

  for (var i=0; i<32; ++i) {
    if (form.step.checked) {  // Single step
      writeArray('i','a');

      if (!confirm("Sort on bit "+i))
        return;    
    }

    var mask = 1<<i;     // Digit (2**i)
    var biggest = 2<<i;  // If all of a is smaller, we're done
    var zeros=0;         // Number of elements in b0, b1
    var ones=0;
    var found=false;     // Any digits past i?

    for (var j=0; j<n; ++j) { // Sort into bins b0, b1
      if ((a[j] & mask) == 0)
        b0[zeros++] = a[j];
      else
        b1[ones++] = a[j];

      if (a[j]>=biggest)  // Any more digits to sort on?
        found=true;
    }

    for (j=0; j<zeros; ++j)  // Concatenate b0, b1 back to a
      a[j]=b0[j];

    for (j=0; j<ones; ++j)
      a[j+zeros]=b1[j];

    form.imoves.value = parseInt(form.imoves.value)+n;

    if (!found)
      break;
  }

  writeArray('i','a');
}
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2  
That code looks awful. I think you'd be way better off reading up on the algorithm and then implementing it yourself. –  Pointy Oct 29 '11 at 4:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The term "radix sort" is a tricky one. There are actually two different sorts that work in a similar manner - MSB (most significant bit) radix and LSB (least significant bit) radix. (You will sometimes see the B replaced with a D for digit). Here are implementations of both.

MSB radix:

//arguments to sort an array:
//arr: array to be sorted
//begin: 0
//end: length of array
//bit: maximum number of bits required to represent numbers in arr
function sort(arr, begin, end, bit)
{
  var i, j, mask;
  i = begin;
  j = end;
  mask = 1 << bit;
  while(i < j)
  {
    while(i < j && !(arr[i] & mask))
    {
      ++i;
    }
    while(i < j && (arr[j - 1] & mask))
    {
      --j;
    }
    if(i < j)
    {
      j--;
      var tmp = arr[i];
      arr[i] = arr[j];
      arr[j] = tmp;
      i++;
    }
  }
  if(bit && i > begin)
  {
    sort(arr, begin, i, bit - 1);
  }
  if(bit && i < end)
  {
    sort(arr, i, end, bit - 1);
  }
}
sort(arr, 0, arr.length, 32);  //Here I've assumed that the values in arr are integers that fit in 32 bits

LSB radix:

function insert(arr, i, j)
{
  tmp = arr[i];
  arr.splice(i, 1);
  arr.splice(j, 0, tmp);
}

//arguments to sort an array:
//arr: array to be sorted
function sort(arr)
{
  var bit, end, i, mask;
  bit = 0;
  while(true) 
  {
    mask = 1 << bit;
    i = 0;
    end = arr.length;
    while(i < end)
    {
      if(arr[i] & mask)
      {
        insert(arr, i, arr.length - 1);
        end--;
      }
      else
      {
        i++;
      }
    }
    bit++;
    if(end === arr.length)
    {
      break;
    }
  }
}

I pulled these algorithms off of http://visualsort.appspot.com/. Then I compiled them to javascript at http://jashkenas.github.com/coffee-script/, and wrote the insert method/reformatted for readability.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi @Aaron, thanks for the help. Two quick questions: (1) would you mind adding argument comments so that I know what values to pass, (2) which method is suppose to be faster, using LSD or MSD? –  nickb Oct 30 '11 at 3:18
    
MSD is generally faster, but it is unstable, whereas LSD is a stable sort. –  Aaron Dufour Oct 30 '11 at 19:15
    
Why is MSD unstable? My use case is only integers –  nickb Oct 30 '11 at 19:23
    
To clarify, stable, in the context of sorting algorithms, means that identical elements will stay in the same order as when they started. MSD can change the order of identical elements. This is only relevant when there is something else to the data. For example, if you have objects representing people that are sorted alphabetically by name, and you LSD radix by birthday, each day with multiple people born on it will have the people sorted alphabetically. MSD will not necessarily retain the alphabetical sorting by name. –  Aaron Dufour Oct 30 '11 at 21:39

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