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I am a java programmer who has started to make apps for iPhone. I have stumbled with a problem. Supose the following code (in java):

Class 1 (building)

public abstract class Building
{
    public void Update()
    {
        specialAction();
    }

    public abstract void specialAction();
}

Class 2 (House)

public abstract class House extends Building
{   
    public abstract void specialAction()
    {
        System.out.println("Special Action Done");
    }
}

Runnable Class

public class Program
{   
    public void main(String[] args)
    {
        House h = new House();
        h.Update();
    }
}

When the Update method from House h (running from the superclass Building) is called in Program the method specialAction from House is called and thus the Console prints "Special Action Done". My question is, would the following code in xcode be equivalent (in terms of inheritance and method overriding rather that console output):

Class 1 (building): .h file:

-(void)Update;
-(void)SpecialAction;

.m file:

-(void)Update
{
    [self specialAction];
}

Class 2 (House, which extends or inherits from Building): .m file:

-(void)SpecialAction
{
    NSLog("Special Action Done");
}

Runnable Class

House* h = [[House alloc] init];
[h Update];
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What did happen, when you tried it? –  vikingosegundo Oct 29 '11 at 4:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your example looks correct. A full program of your Java example is approximated in ObjC like so:

/* Building.h */
@interface Building : NSObject
- (void)Update;
- (void)specialAction;
@end

/* Building.m */
@implementation Building

- (void)Update
{
    [self specialAction];
}

- (void)specialAction
{
    assert(0 && "override required"); // << see note
}

@end

/* House.h */
@interface House : Building
@end

/* House.m */
@implementation House

- (void)specialAction
{
    NSLog(@"Special Action Done");
}

@end

void ProgramMain()
{
    House * h = [House new];
    [h Update];
    [h release];
}

Formal abstract methods are not built into the language, but you can approximate it using protocols.

You can consider all ObjC methods to be virtual.

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The "standard" way of creating methods in an abstract class is sending a doesNotRecognizeSelector message, i.e. [self doesNotRecognizeSelector:_cmd]; –  sebnow Oct 29 '11 at 5:31
1  
@sebnow I don't consider either "standard". It was really just an illustration. An implementation may take multiple forms. –  justin Oct 29 '11 at 5:40

Does House inherit from Building?

@interface House : Building

If so, you don't have to implement your special action here with a different name. You can declare

-(void)Update;

in House.h

and define it in House.m as

-(void)Update
{
    NSLog("Special Action Done");
}

and calling the Update method on a House object will invoke the definition in House.m

P.S. Since you are new to iOS, I'd like to mention the convention that: class names such as "House" start with a capital letter; method names and variable names start with lowercase letters.

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Sorry for not explaning but on both the java and Objective-C examples the class <code>House</code> extends <code>Building</code> –  rickyman20 Oct 29 '11 at 4:31

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