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I'm facing an annoying situation where my serialization/deserialization isn't as expected.

I want

<OuterClass>
  <Assets>
      <Asset>Asset_A</Asset>
      <Asset>Asset_B</Asset>
  </Assets>
  ...
</OuterClass> 

but I'm getting

<OuterClass>
  <Assets>
    <Asset>
      <Asset>Asset_A</Asset>
    </Asset>
    <Asset>
      <Asset>Asset_B</Asset>
    </Asset>
  </Assets>
  ...
</OuterClass>

As you can see the Asset tag comes twice.

The code doing this is ..

public class OuterClass
{
    [DataMember(Name = "Assets", Order = 10)]
    public List<AssetClass> Assets { get; set; }
    ...
    [DataContract(Name = "Asset", Namespace = "")]
    public class AssetClass
    {
        [DataMember(Name = "Asset", Order = 10)]
        public string Asset { get; set; }
        ...
    } 
}

I know I've listed 'Name="Asset"' twice in the code too, but if I take out either of them, the framework adds it's own name inside there still screwing it up. Somehow I suspect I need to change the structure of the code itself but not sure how to do that.

(edit) I'm using the in-framework serialization/deserialization helpers. The code for that is (simplified):

public string ToXmlString(OuterClass AssetsWrapper)
{
    DataContractSerializer ser = new DataContractSerializer(typeof(OuterClass));            
    MemoryStream memStream = new MemoryStream();

    // Convert object -> stream -> byte[] -> string (whew!)
    ser.WriteObject(memStream, AssetsWrapper);
    byte[] AssetsWrapperByte = memStream.ToArray();
    return Encoding.UTF8.GetString(AssetsWrapperByte);
}
share|improve this question
    
Did you consider using binary serialization? Also, I think it's being serialized as a subnode because it's a nested class. –  Zhanger Oct 29 '11 at 4:48
    
Your DataContract and DataMember is same –  DeveloperX Oct 29 '11 at 5:29
    
Please show the code you use to serialize. –  John Saunders Oct 29 '11 at 6:37
    
@John, I've updated it –  DeepSpace101 Oct 29 '11 at 19:01
    
@Zhanger, I'm doing binary serialization (in fact I'm transforming it 3 times :( ). Let me check with it as a non-nested class –  DeepSpace101 Oct 29 '11 at 19:02

4 Answers 4

So what you are seeing is the OuterClass, then which corrosponds to your List of AssetClass then each , and finally each AssetClass.Asset property is serialized to another tag.

You can not obtain your desired XML output without implementing the serialization (via ISerialize, I believe) yourself.

share|improve this answer

You need to change List<AssetClass> Assets { get; set; } to List<string> Assets { get; set; } and give sub element name with XmlElement attribute and make some changes on your class:

public class OuterClass
{
    [DataMember(Name = "Assets", Order = 10),
    XmlElement(ElementName = "Asset")]
    public List<string> Assets { get; set; }
    ...
    //[DataContract(Name = "Asset", Namespace = "")]
    //public class AssetClass
    //{
    //  [DataMember(Name = "Asset", Order = 10)]
    //  public string Asset { get; set; }
    //  ...
    //} 
}

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Munim, with that I get <Assets xmlns:a="schemas.microsoft.com/2003/10/Serialization/Arrays">; <a:string>Asset One</a:string> <a:string>Asset Two</a:string> </Assets> I also updated my original post with the serialization/deserialization snippet. Any ideas? Thanks! –  DeepSpace101 Oct 29 '11 at 18:56
    
Also, if I switch from DataContractSerializer to XmlSerializer, with the exact same data contract, I now get <OuterClass> <Asset>Asset One</Asset> <Asset>Asset Two</Asset> </OuterClass> The <Assets> tag between the <Asset> and <OuterClass> tags is now missing! This is getting interesting... –  DeepSpace101 Oct 29 '11 at 19:21

You may use XmlSerializer instead of DataContractSerializer and that will give you more control over your XML.

share|improve this answer
    
I did that along with Munim's recommendation (below). With that I go from having duplicate <Asset> tags to single <Asset> tags - but my outer <Assets> tag gets lost. Would appreciate any thoughts ... –  DeepSpace101 Oct 29 '11 at 19:24
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok, so I was able to resolve this .NET serialization weirdness by tinkering around with both the class markup as well as the actual serialization/deserialization code. Although the answers didn't work as-is, thanks to Thomas and Munim for hints that led me down the right path after some experimentation.

Serialization changes

Replaced DataContractSerializer with XmlSerializer. This totally sucks because it's a LOT (500%) slower :( ... (performance here)

public string ToXmlString(OuterClass AssetsWrapper)
{
    XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(OuterClass));            
    MemoryStream memStream = new MemoryStream();

    // Convert object -> stream -> byte[] -> string (whew!)
    ser.WriteObject(memStream, AssetsWrapper);
    byte[] AssetsWrapperByte = memStream.ToArray();
    return Encoding.UTF8.GetString(AssetsWrapperByte);
}

Class markup changes:

public class OuterClass
{
    [DataMember(Name = "Assets", Order = 10)]
    public ListAssetClass Assets { get; set; }
    ...

    //[DataContract(Name = "Asset123", Namespace = "")]
    public class ListAssetClass
    {
        [XmlElement(ElementName = "Asset")]
        public List<string> Assets { get; set; }
        ...
    }
}

now gives me

<Assets>
  <Asset>Asset One</Asset>
  <Asset>Asset Two</Asset>
</Assets>

I'm surprised that the framework serialization/deserialization is so twisted and slow. I might have to look for an external library sometime.

share|improve this answer
    
The XmlSerializer is ancient. You should try to make data contract serialization work for you, or else just use LINQ to XML. –  John Saunders Oct 29 '11 at 21:45

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