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I currently use this handy conversion extension method to do conversions between types:

    public static T To<T>(this IConvertible obj)
    {
        return (T)Convert.ChangeType(obj, typeof(T));
    }

However, it doesn't like converting valid values to Nullable, for example, this fails:

    "1".To<int?>();

Obviously, 1 is easily converted to an (int?), but it gets the error:

    Invalid cast from 'System.String' to 'System.Nullable`1[[System.Int32, mscorlib, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089]]'.

This is an obviously simplified example, in reality I'm using it to do conversions from string types like so:

packageDb.Quantity = package.package.ElementDeep(Namespace + "PackageQuantity", Namespace + "ActualQuantity", Namespace + "Quantity").ValueOrNull().To<int?>();

If Convert.ChangeType doesn't like Nullable, anyone have any great ideas?

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See my question: stackoverflow.com/questions/773078/… –  Nathan Koop Apr 27 '09 at 14:23
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6 Answers 6

up vote 73 down vote accepted
public static T To<T>(this IConvertible obj)
{
    Type t = typeof(T);
    Type u = Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(t);

    if (u != null)
    {
        if (obj == null)
            return default(T);

        return (T)Convert.ChangeType(obj, u);
    }
    else
    {
        return (T)Convert.ChangeType(obj, t);
    }
}
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Thanks Luke! This is perfect. It was t.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>)) and Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(t) that really helped me out here. This is good stuff. Thanks again. –  TheSoftwareJedi Apr 27 '09 at 15:47
1  
Depending on your needs its helpful to change if (obj == null) TO if (obj == null || obj is String && obj.ToString() == "") –  Jarrett Widman Nov 28 '10 at 5:25
    
As a slight simplification/clarification, if T is nullable, and obj is null, isn't return default(T) always the same as simply return null ? –  goodeye Nov 25 '12 at 2:01
1  
@goodeye: Yes, it is the same, but the compiler won't allow return null unless the method also has a where T : class constraint. –  LukeH Nov 26 '12 at 0:34
    
@JarrettWidman I would implement the string use case you mention as a method overload where the parameter is a string instead of an IConvertible. Let the compiler do some optimization for you. –  Richard Collette Nov 26 '12 at 16:49
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public static T To<T>(this IConvertible obj) 
{
    Type t = typeof(T);
    if (t.IsGenericType && t.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>))
    	t = t.GetGenericArguments()[0];

    return (T)Convert.ChangeType(obj, t); 
}

But if the conversion fail, it will throw an exception, not returning a null as should be expected.

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good answer, perfectly on track, but I can only award correct to 1, and Luke's does the null checking. Cheers! –  TheSoftwareJedi Apr 27 '09 at 15:49
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I've ended up with this

private static T To<T>(this Object @object, Boolean returnDefaultOnException)
{
    Type type = typeof(T);
    Type underlyingTypeOfNullable = Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(type);
    try
    {
        return (T) Convert.ChangeType(@object, underlyingTypeOfNullable ?? type);
    }
    catch (Exception exception)
    {
        if (returnDefaultOnException)
            return default(T);
        String typeName = type.Name;
        if (underlyingTypeOfNullable != null)
            typeName += " of " + underlyingTypeOfNullable.Name;
        throw new InvalidCastException("Object can't be cast to " + typeName, exception);

    }
}
public static T To<T>(this Object @object) { return @object.To<T>(returnDefaultOnException: false); }
public static T ToOrDefault<T>(this Object @object) { return @object.To<T>(returnDefaultOnException: true); }

It behaves like the LINQ extension methods Single and SingleOrDefault and First and FirstOrDefault.

In short, To<T>() tries to convert and throws on failure while ToOrDefault<T>() tries to convert and returns default(T) on failure.

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Maybe I'm missing the point, but in the instance of Nullable, how does your method provide either a readability, performance, or maintenance advantage over a simple cast, like (int?)1 ?

Aside from that, perhaps another extension method?

public static T? ToNullable<T>(this T obj) where T:struct
{
    return (T?)obj;
}

Edit

After reviewing your edit, why would the generic function that I provided not work as a substitute to your To<T> function in that line of code? You can't allow a conversion to Nullable for any type (which is why ChangeType doesn't work) because that generic only accepts value types. You'll either have to use a function like the one I provided or change your signature of To<T> to only accept value types and add a special case for Nullable<T>.

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Is there a way to roll this into my existing method, and have it detect the nullable generic, and handle appropriately? –  TheSoftwareJedi Apr 27 '09 at 14:47
    
Well, you could say this... if(typeof(T).IsGeneric && typeof(T).GetGenericTypeDefinition().Name.StartsWith("Nullable")) will tell you if the type is nullable. You can then apply the special case, but I'm not sure that can work when To<T> accepts non-struct types. What would be the issue of just changing to use ToNullable<T> when that's what you want? –  Adam Robinson Apr 27 '09 at 14:55
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Luke's solution was good for me (and obviously got his up vote) but I simplified it for me this way

    private static Type ResolveType(String typeName)
    {
        Type t = Type.GetType(typeName);
        if (t == null)
            return null;

        Type u = Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(t);

        if (u != null) {
            t = u;
        }
        return t;
    }

because I started from a string not from a type... thoughts?

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This is the method that I currently use (I got my answer on SO), it converts from string to nullable type:

    public static Nullable<T> ConvertToNullable<T>(this string s) where T : struct
    {
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(s.Trim()))
        {
            TypeConverter conv = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(typeof(Nullable<>).MakeGenericType(typeof(T)));
            return (Nullable<T>)conv.ConvertFrom(s);
        }
        return null;
    }
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