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I am making an Ubuntu package that depends on Tomcat7 through HTTPS. To make it convenient for our customers, I would like the install script of the package enable HTTPS in Tomcat7. This is pretty easy to do manually; in the file /etc/tomcat7/server.xml, one needs to uncomment the following block:

<!--
<Connector port="8443" protocol="HTTP/1.1" SSLEnabled="true"
           maxThreads="150" scheme="https" secure="true"
           clientAuth="false" sslProtocol="TLS" />
-->

How could I do this from a shellscript? Preferebly in a way that it still works for slight modifications of the exact pattern. I think the rule would be something along the lines of search for '<Connector port="8443"' and then remove <!-- and --> before and after the block.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Consider apply a patch on your server.xml.

  1. Generating a patch file:

    diff -ruN server.xml.old server.xml.new > mydiff.patch
    

    Where server.xml.old is the original file, and server.xml.new is the file as you want.

    The patch (mydiff.patch) will look like this:

    --- server.xml.old  2011-10-29 04:03:25.000000000 -0300
    +++ server.xml.new 2011-10-29 04:04:03.000000000 -0300
    @@ -1,10 +1,10 @@
     (...)
    
    - <!--
      <Connector port="8443" protocol="HTTP/1.1" SSLEnabled="true"
                maxThreads="150" scheme="https" secure="true"
                clientAuth="false" sslProtocol="TLS" />
    - --->
    
     (...)
    
  2. Then, just apply the patch:

     patch server.xml mydiff.patch
    

    You can run the patch command with the flag -N. Thus, it will skip files that seems already patched.

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Thanks. What will happen if I try to apply the patch, but the patch has already been applied? E.g. the sysadmin had already enabled this connector before installing my package? –  Jeroen Oct 29 '11 at 8:27
1  
You can run the patch with the flag -N. Thus, it will skis files that seems already patched. –  tcurvelo Oct 30 '11 at 4:55
    
For step 2, isn't that "patch server.xml < mydiff.patch" ? –  Ed Norris Feb 20 at 20:33
    
It works in both ways (linux.die.net/man/1/patch) –  tcurvelo Feb 20 at 21:12

diff should most probably be the tool of your choice. But if the original config file is changed frequently, diff could not be able to apply your script in future versions.

sed also has the ability to read in more than one line. You may want to look at this example that also deals with modifying an xml document.

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This might work:

 sed -nr '/^<!--/,/^-->/!{p;b};/^<!--/{h;d};H;/^-->/{x;/<Connector port="8443"/{s/(^<!--\s*\n|\n\s*-->)//g};p}'

This ignores all non-comment lines. Saves the comment lines in hold space then deletes the start/end comment delimiters if the comment contains <Connector port="8443" and then prints the comment/non-comment.

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