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I have a global function as follows:

__global__ void sort(float* D,  float* new_D)
{
        int  i  = threadIdx.x + blockIdx.x * blockDim.x ;   // i>=0 && i<N

        new_D[ 4*(i/4)+i%2]   = D[ 4*(i/4)+2*(i%2) ];
}

And it's called like this:

sort<<<(N/threadperblock),threadperblock>>>(D,new_D);

The function operates incorrectly when I define "N" more than 2048 in single precision, and 4096 in double precision as I get wrong answers. What's going wrong?

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4  
What‘s a ‘wrong asnwer‘. which graphic card do you use? –  pQB Oct 29 '11 at 11:35
4  
what does S mean? –  Vlad Oct 29 '11 at 11:55
2  
N should be an integer, hence, no roundoff. If your N is floating point, you're doing it wrong. –  Patrick87 Oct 29 '11 at 12:18
4  
How can there be "round off error" in a kernel which only performs assignment? –  talonmies Oct 29 '11 at 16:36
    
N is an exact multiple of threadperblock, I assume? –  Tom Oct 30 '11 at 8:29

2 Answers 2

It is absolutely impossible to say anything about why you might not be getting the expected results from your code. An obvious source of error would be uninitialised memory. Your indexing scheme is only assign values to half of new_D, so if you have not taken deliberate steps to assign values to the other values, then the results will contain uninitialised values and miscomparisons or unexpected values between the GPU version and a host implementation could occur.

To illustrate my point, here is a complete repro case which works correctly at any input size which is a power of two:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <assert.h>
#include <stdio.h>

const int N = (2<<20);

__global__ void sort(float* D,  float* new_D)
{
    int  i  = threadIdx.x + blockIdx.x * blockDim.x ;   // i>=0 && i<N
    new_D[ 4*(i/4)+i%2]   = D[ 4*(i/4)+2*(i%2) ];
}

__host__ void host_sort(const float* D,  float* new_D)
{
    for(int i=0; i<N; i++)
        new_D[ 4*(i/4)+i%2]   = D[ 4*(i/4)+2*(i%2) ];
}

int main(void)
{

    const size_t dsize =sizeof(float) * size_t(N);

    float *D = (float *)malloc(dsize);  
    float *new_D = (float *)malloc(dsize);  
    for(int i=0; i<N; i++) {
        D[i] = (float)i;
        new_D[i] = -999.0f;
    }

    float *D_gpu, *new_D_gpu;
    assert( cudaMalloc((void**)&D_gpu, dsize) == cudaSuccess );
    assert( cudaMemcpy(D_gpu, D, dsize, cudaMemcpyHostToDevice) == cudaSuccess); 
    assert( cudaMalloc((void**)&new_D_gpu, dsize) == cudaSuccess );
    assert( cudaMemcpy(new_D_gpu, new_D, dsize, cudaMemcpyHostToDevice) == cudaSuccess); 
    dim3 blocksize = dim3(128,1,1);
    dim3 gridsize = dim3(N/blocksize.x,1,1);

    host_sort(D, new_D);

    sort<<< gridsize, blocksize >>>(D_gpu,new_D_gpu);
    assert( cudaPeekAtLastError() == cudaSuccess );
    assert( cudaThreadSynchronize() == cudaSuccess );

    float *new_D_host = (float *)malloc(dsize); 
    assert( cudaMemcpy(new_D_host, new_D_gpu, dsize, cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost) == cudaSuccess); 

    for(int i=0; i<N; i++) 
        assert( new_D_host[i] == new_D[i] );

    return 0;
}

You should be aware that half of the threads in your kernel are effectively doing redundant assignments and unnecessarily burning memory bandwidth as a result.

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What is the threadperblock value? Does it change when you are working in single precission and double precission?

The reason I am asking --- threadIdx.x, blockIdx.x and blockDim.x work as unsigned short. The maximum value that they can hold is 65535, until you cast it to int. If you exceed that value, also when doing mathematical operations, you can get really weird results.

Try this:

int i=blockDim.x;
i=i*blockIdx.x+threadIdx.x
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