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I have a mathematica list in which I want to replace all 2s with 1 and everything else to 0.

For example.

{0,1,2,3,2,3,4,5,2,2,6}

->

{0,0,1,0,1,0,0,0,1,1,0}

I assume it's possible using replace all, but what rules would achieve this?

Thanks!

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7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can map the function (Boole[2 == #]) & onto the list.

In[2]:= (Boole[2 == #]) & /@ {0, 1, 2, 3, 2, 3, 4, 5, 2, 2, 6}
Out[2]= {0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0}

Explanation of the different parts:

  • /@ applies a function to each element on the list.
  • The () & is the syntax used for anonymous functions, and the parameter the function takes is given the name #.
  • The Boole converts True/False to 1/0.

So, in total, we create an anonymous function, which compares its input to 2, and gives either 0 or 1. This function is then mapped onto the list.

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I've seen this "mystical ampersand" in my mathematica travels. Could you explain what it does? –  VolatileStorm Oct 29 '11 at 12:31
1  
@VolatileStorm: It just creates a function. In this case, the function could just as well be defined as: isTwo[n_] := Boole[2 == n];, and then we could replace (Boole[2 == #]) & with isTwo in the example above. –  Sebastian Paaske Tørholm Oct 29 '11 at 12:35
2  
Rather than ()&, it's the #-& pair that's used for pure functions. The () just sets precedence of execution and in this case, would run fine without it. –  r.m. Oct 29 '11 at 13:45

You can use

Replace[{0, 1, 2, 3, 2, 3, 4, 5, 2, 2, 6}, {2 -> 1, _ -> 0}, 1]

I used Replace instead of ReplaceAll to be able to tell Mathematica at which "level" the replacement must take place (the last argument of Replace)

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But MatchQ[{0, 1, 2, 3, 2, 3, 4, 5, 2, 2, 6}, _] returns True, does it not? –  acl Oct 29 '11 at 12:28
    
Sorry everyone, I corrected it right after the incorrect post, but SO appears to be a bit slow to deliver the newest version to all viewers. –  Szabolcs Oct 29 '11 at 12:34

If your list is numeric, I recommend this:

a = {0, 1, 2, 3, 2, 3, 4, 5, 2, 2, 6};

1 - Unitize[2 - a]

Since timing data has been introduced in the answers, I shall add my own data points.

In order of appearance. With Mathematica 7 on Windows 7.

First, with sparse matches (twos):

In[1]:=
data = RandomInteger[{0, 40000}, 150000];
(Boole[2 == #]) & /@ data // timeAvg
Replace[data, {2 -> 1, _ -> 0}, 1] // timeAvg
1 - Unitize[2 - data] // timeAvg
KroneckerDelta /@ (data - 2) // timeAvg
Unitize@Clip[data, {2, 2}, {0, 0}] // timeAvg

Out[2]= 0.0654

Out[3]= 0.01684

Out[4]= 0.0010224

Out[5]= 0.106

Out[6]= 0.00026944

And with dense matches:

In[1]:=
data = RandomInteger[{0, 5}, 150000];
(Boole[2 == #]) & /@ data // timeAvg
Replace[data, {2 -> 1, _ -> 0}, 1] // timeAvg
1 - Unitize[2 - data] // timeAvg
KroneckerDelta /@ (data - 2) // timeAvg
Unitize@Clip[data, {2, 2}, {0, 0}] // timeAvg

Out[2]= 0.0656

Out[3]= 0.01308

Out[4]= 0.0013968

Out[5]= 0.0842

Out[6]= 0.000648
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2  
This is nice because Unitize uses PossibleZeroQ for comparisons –  belisarius Oct 29 '11 at 15:24

Try

{0,1,2,3,2,3,4,5,2,2,6}/.{2->1,(x_/;MemberQ[Range[0,9],x])->0}

which takes advantage of the following property of ReplaceAll:

The first rule that applies to a particular part is used; 
no further rules are tried on that part, or on any of its subparts. 

This allows for quite a bit of flexibility (eg Range[] may be changed to anything else).

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Just for fun...

$v = {0, 1, 2, 3, 2, 3, 4, 5, 2, 2, 6};

KroneckerDelta /@ ($v - 2)

(* returns {0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0} *)
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Or this

lst={0,1,2,3,2,3,4,5,2,2,6};
Clip[
    lst,
    {2,2},
    {0,0}
]

which is around 100 times faster than all the others, except Szabolcs', from which it is 7 times faster.

Timing[Do[Clip[lst, {2, 2}, {0, 0}];, {10000}]]
{0.021858, Null}

Timing[Do[KroneckerDelta /@ (lst - 2), {10000}]]  
{0.131487, Null}

Timing[Do[1 - Unitize[2 - lst], {10000}];]    
{0.214324, Null}

Timing[Do[
  lst /. {2 -> 1, (x_ /; MemberQ[Range[0, 9], x]) -> 0};, {10000}]]   
{0.533773, Null}

Timing[Do[Replace[lst, {2 -> 1, _ -> 0}, 1];, {10000}]]   
{0.066136, Null}
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hope you don't mind my adding the timing results to your answer –  Verbeia Oct 29 '11 at 21:31
    
@Verbeia not at all. I get randomly different timings. let me see –  acl Oct 29 '11 at 22:17
    
For what it's worth, these timings were done on a two-year-old Macbook Pro, 2.5GHz. –  Verbeia Oct 29 '11 at 23:14
1  
The question requests that all twos be replaced with ones. Please correct this. Otherwise, Clip is a good choice that I had passed by. After this answer I was avoiding it for that particular use, due to a failing, but it is good here. It is however not 100 times faster, but less than 10X as fast. –  Mr.Wizard Oct 30 '11 at 1:05

Just for completeness sake, you can also roll your own transformation function:

In[1]:= TwoToOne[2] = 1; TwoToOne[_] = 0;
In[2]:= Map[TwoToOne, {0, 1, 2, 3, 2, 3, 4, 5, 2, 2, 6}]
Out[2]:= {0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0}
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