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For the home page's canonical URL...

<link rel="canonical" href="http://mysite.com" />

OR

<link rel="canonical" href="http://mysite.com/" />

AND

Where should it be placed within the head section? at the top, somewhere in the middle, or last?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
The rel="canonical" attribute should be used only to specify the preferred
version of many pages with identical content (although minor differences,
such as sort order, are okay).

That's from the Google description of the canonical link. Therefore you shouldn't be using the site's root, therefore this question is moot.

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1  
For my home page, I assign a single post to be the "home" page. Therefore, I have two URLs that go to the same page, www.site.com and www.site.com/single-post-title. So I'm trying to tell search agents which URL to index for both these pages. But the question is, slash or no slash? –  RegEdit Oct 29 '11 at 13:39
2  
In that case, slash. That way you are referencing the index file of the root, rather than the root itself. –  Niet the Dark Absol Oct 29 '11 at 13:42
1  
Its not moot, you might have a duplicate home page under a trailing /index.html, so then you would want a canonical on that page, which would then be on the root. –  moobot Jan 30 '13 at 6:46

Should it? I don't think there's a single answer to that. Does it matter? Yes, in many cases. It's two different URLs, and there can be cases (such as with web optimizationn or analytics) when code is looking at the URL and making decisions on what it contains. If it expects "www.mysite.com/page?test=1" and sees "www.mysite.com/page/?test=1" it won't work. Server redirects may also be affected by the difference.

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Thanks but I'm not asking about inside pages, I'm only asking about the home page and whether a trailing slash is required, preferred or irrelevant. example.com, example.com/, www.example.com and www.example.com/ are all see as different URLs by google. –  RegEdit Oct 29 '11 at 13:28

Assuming you don't already have a redirect to force a trailing /, then you can choose to use either version of the canonical tag.

Its up to you, how would you like your url to appear in the search results, with a trailing / or without?

You may place the canonical tag any where in the head section.

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