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I was experimenting with garbage collector and found strange count iCnt on destructor call. Here is the Code:-

public class MyClass
{
    static long iCnt;
    public MyClass()
    {
        iCnt++;
    }

    ~MyClass()
    {
        iCnt--;
    }
    static public string ObjectCount
    {
        get
        {
            return iCnt.ToString();
        }
    }
}

Below code is to create objects, delete objects(De-refernce by assigning to null) and explicitly call GC.Collect(). I have having all it in a Win Form which has Timer of interval = 100, timer show the current count of iCnt.

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    MyClass[] Objs;
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void btnCreateObjects_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Objs = new MyClass[1000];
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
        {
            Objs[i] = new MyClass();
        }
    }

    private void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        label2.Text = MyClass.ObjectCount;
    }
    private void btnDeleteObjects_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
        {
            Objs[i] = null;
        }
    }

    private void btnInvokeGC_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        GC.Collect();
    }
}

Now create the object until the garbage collector is called automatically(for me it took 24 clicks). Again repeat this action.

I saw this iCnt < 1000. which keeps me confusing how the destructor called in this scenario. when iCnt < 1000, click on delete object which deference the Objs[1000]. Then call GC.Collect() which makes count of iCnt < 0 (very strange).

Can anybody explain me this behavior. Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
1  
Your question is very unclear. Please read tinyurl.com/so-hints and edit it for clarify. Things like "I saw this iCnt < 1000" aren't clear in terms of what's going on. It would be helpful if you could write a console application showing what you're interested in, as then it's easier for everyone else to run it. Also note that your counter isn't thread-safe at the moment - you should be using Interlocked.Increment and Interlocked.Decrement. –  Jon Skeet Oct 29 '11 at 14:25
    
@DanielA.White: It depends on which spec you read. The MS C# spec still calls it a destructor. –  Jon Skeet Oct 29 '11 at 14:25
    
Thanks @JonSkeet, just i ran it after using Interlocked.Increment and Interlocked.Decrement and guess what i resolved it my self. –  abhishekrvce Oct 29 '11 at 14:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is a pretty classic threading bug. The destructor runs on the finalizer thread, asynchronously from the thread that increments the count. You need to use Interlocked.Increment() and Decrement() to do this safely. Or use the lock keyword.

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't this mean the constructors are still getting called when the GC collects? I doubt that's the case for 1000 small objects. –  lesderid Oct 29 '11 at 14:33
1  
@les - The finalizer thread runs after a collection. Writing finalizers that have a side effect is in general a bad idea. –  Hans Passant Oct 29 '11 at 14:42
    
Well yeah, obviously. But I don't see it happening in this example. –  lesderid Oct 29 '11 at 14:49
    
That's a common problem with threading race bugs, they never repro well. –  Hans Passant Oct 29 '11 at 14:50
    
After making my count variable thread safe, the count is consistent and is multiple of 1000 every time. WoW I learn classic implementation for threading bug in GC. Thanks @HansPassant –  abhishekrvce Oct 29 '11 at 15:17

I think what you really need to do is to employ the "using" statement. Like this:

using(foo = new bar()) { ... code ... }

With using you can be certain that the dispose event will occur when the code terminates, even if it throws an exception. In the situation that you've described the C# garbage collector decides when to trigger the dispose event (which is what calls your destructor). So you can have long periods when objects are sitting around with no references to them but not disposed just the same.

share|improve this answer
    
You may want to mention that using would require that his class implements IDisposable and that his finalizer logic should be moved into the Dispose method. –  Greg Oct 29 '11 at 21:27

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