Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have searched about this but can't seem to find exactly how to do it. Is there a simple way to directly convert the value into a variable? This illustration may help you understand my problem.

var a = "randomText";

var randomText = "someothervalue";

I have read about eval() but it says it's not recommended to use since it's 'evil'.

Please help. thanks.

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you have a set of data that you need to access by name, then use a proper data structure instead of floating a bunch of variables around. Use an object.

var someObject = {};
someObject['foo'] = 123;
var propertyName = 'foo';
alert(someObject[propertyName]);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for correct answer and suggestion to use proper data structures. –  JAAulde Oct 29 '11 at 15:45
add comment

If you're creating a global variable:

var a = "randomText";
window[a] = "value_of_random_text";
share|improve this answer
    
+1 and if you're not working with globals, using square bracket notation on the current object in scope is the proper methodology. –  JAAulde Oct 29 '11 at 14:55
add comment

You cant use it without EVAL.

Anad Evals bad Side is Mostly with Injection.

dont Get Confused. Its Not Evil.

jQuery Uses This a Lot. (e.g. json...)

share|improve this answer
1  
eval breaks scope, is very slow and complicates debugging. It is evil. jQuery doesn't use it a lot. It only uses it for JSON parsing when the browser doesn't have a proper JSON parser built in (and most browsers do these days). –  Quentin Oct 29 '11 at 14:39
    
@Quentin , Can you please explain : Breaks Scope ? –  Royi Namir Oct 29 '11 at 14:46
    
Using square bracket notation on the current object in scope is the proper methodology. –  JAAulde Oct 29 '11 at 14:53
    
@RoyiNamir jQuery makes every attempt to avoid eval because it is not proper to use. It stoops to use it when absolutely no other means of unserializing JSON is available. IMO, they should completely remove use of eval and warn devs to make the JSON API available where it is found not to be. On my projects, I always include Crockford's JSON API shim ahead of jQuery to ensure eval does not get used. It's worth the few extra bytes. –  JAAulde Oct 29 '11 at 15:50
add comment

eval("var " +a+ " = 'someothervalue';");

It shouldn't be "evil" in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
Using square bracket notation on the current object in scope is the proper methodology. –  JAAulde Oct 29 '11 at 14:56
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.