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I have encountered a very odd problem with the Windows command interpreter. It occurs on both XP and Windows 7. My description below applies to a Perl script, but this problem applies to running any kind of program on the command line which takes command line parameters.

For a test I am using the Perl script check-params.pl which simply outputs what it saw as parameters -

use strict;
use warnings;
while (my $param = shift @ARGV) {
    print "Param: [$param]\n";
}

Thus if I run -

perl check-params.pl "a b|<>" c^|^<^>cc

Then the output is

[Param: a b|<>]
[Param: c|<>cc]

as expected. The special chars | < > work fine inside the double quotes, but when outside quotes you escape them with ^.

However when a double quote is added to the quoted param eg in

perl check-params.pl "a\" b|<>"

Then I get the error -

> was unexpected at this time.

But if the double quote comes after the special char | < or >, then it works OK.

You can easily fix this by escaping the special | < > char with ^ inside the quoted parameter. eg

perl check-params.pl "a\" b^|"

However not only does the escaped double quote affect the special chars | < > in the current parameter but it affects these special chars inside any subsequent parameters.

eg if I do this -

perl check-params.pl "aa \"bb" ccc | perl check-pipe.pl

(where check-pipe.pl simply outputs what the pipe received -

use strict;
use warnings;
while (<STDIN>) {
    print "PIPE RECEIVED ---> $_";
}

)

then output is -

Param: [aa "bb]
Param: [ccc]
Param: [|]
Param: [perl]
Param: [check-pipe.pl]

ie it treats the pipe | as a literal character, and no piping occurs.

Has anybody any experience of this problem, and know of any workaround ?

I have written some Perl scripts to process web log files, and one uses regex's, which I pass inside a quoted param on the command line. The regex may contain characters such as | < >, and it may have a double quote also, which I enter as \". Thus the above problem is cropping up.

Any help much appreciated, thanks.


Thanks for reply, but on trying this on XP SP3, Perl script is seeing two command line params.

This problem is not related to Perl, eg

echo "a \"b|c"

produces error -

'c"' is not recognized as an internal or external command,
operable program or batch file.

but

echo "a b|\"c"

works, because the \" comes after the special char |.

It must be a bug in the command interpreter. I would be interested to know more about this, and find a workaround if possible. This problem messes up running some useful scripts. It is quite a glaring problem for a command interpreter. I tried on Windows 7 also, and same problem occurs there with the above echo test.


Additional Information:

I have updated the scripts check-params.pl and check-pipe.pl to give more useful information :-

check-params.pl :-

use strict;
use warnings;
while (my $param = shift @ARGV) {
    print "COMMAND LINE RECEIVED: [$param]\n";
}

check-pipe.pl :-

use strict;
use warnings;
while (<STDIN>) {
    print "PIPE RECEIVED: $_";
}

while (my $param = shift @ARGV) {
    print "COMMAND LINE RECEIVED: [$param]\n";
}

For example running :-

perl pl/utils/check-params.pl l1 l1-b l1-c | perl pl/utils/check-pipe.pl l2 l2-b | perl pl/utils/check-pipe.pl l3 l3-b | perl pl/utils/check-pipe.pl united arsenal rangers raith

produces output :-

PIPE RECEIVED: PIPE RECEIVED: PIPE RECEIVED: COMMAND LINE RECEIVED: [l1]
PIPE RECEIVED: PIPE RECEIVED: PIPE RECEIVED: COMMAND LINE RECEIVED: [l1-b]
PIPE RECEIVED: PIPE RECEIVED: PIPE RECEIVED: COMMAND LINE RECEIVED: [l1-c]
PIPE RECEIVED: PIPE RECEIVED: COMMAND LINE RECEIVED: [l2]
PIPE RECEIVED: PIPE RECEIVED: COMMAND LINE RECEIVED: [l2-b]
PIPE RECEIVED: COMMAND LINE RECEIVED: [l3]
PIPE RECEIVED: COMMAND LINE RECEIVED: [l3-b]
COMMAND LINE RECEIVED: [united]
COMMAND LINE RECEIVED: [arsenal]
COMMAND LINE RECEIVED: [rangers]
COMMAND LINE RECEIVED: [raith]

thus confirming that this command line will work as expected. The scripts will work with any number of pipes on the command line.


Additional Information:

I find I can get this to work using numerous workarounds - eg the ^" Harry mentioned is one example. Sometimes you can recraft the regex to avoid using the ". When there are two \" sequences before the special char | < > then the problem does not occur. Before running any commmand I run check-params.pl and check-pipe.pl to verify how the Perl scripts will see the command line parameters, eg the above edit to my OP describes these scripts, which I have modified since my OP.

share|improve this question
    
Although I believe I've found a solution for you (see the latest edit to my answer) if you are entering the regular expressions interactively you might find it more convenient for your scripts to prompt for them rather than putting them on the command line. That way you won't have to escape all the special characters. –  Harry Johnston Oct 30 '11 at 21:26
    
Many thanks for info. I had gained the impression from my tests in my OP that \" was an escape sequence. It is not feasible for me to enter command line params via a prompt as I have a great many commands and they are quite complex. I copy and paste them from a text file, and sometimes I copy several and run them all at once. (With Quick Edit Mode on you can just right-click to paste into the command window). –  user995887 Nov 1 '11 at 15:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The double quote in \" is considered to match the initial double quote, ending the quoted parameter. To include a double quote in a quoted parameter use two double quotes:

perl check-params.pl "a"" b|<>"

should produce the result you are expecting, depending on how perl.exe parses the command-line parameters (I've tested using command scripts as I don't have Perl installed). You'll need to change your script so that "" instead of \" is treated as a double quote.

Additional: this command line

echo "a \"b|c"

results in an error message starting c" is not recognized. This is not a bug.

A backslash is not an escape character, so the command line contains one quoted string ("a \") followed by a pipe (|) which makes the rest (c") an additional command, which the output from the echo command is piped into.

If you instead say

echo "a ""b|c"

then there is just one quoted string ("a ""b|c") and it will work as expected.

Unfortunately, I can now confirm that ActivePerl's command-line parsing causes

perl check-params.pl "a"" b|"

to be split into two parameters. You may need to fetch the entire command line (if there is a way to do that in Perl) and parse it yourself.

Additional:

perl check-params.pl ^"a\^" b^|c^"

produces the desired result. This works by escaping all the special characters, including the quote marks.

share|improve this answer
    
The ^" is quite helpful, and I have added this to my numerous workarounds. There appear to be 2 issues here, one is how the Windows command interpreter works, and the other is how Perl parses a command line. –  user995887 Nov 1 '11 at 15:28

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