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So I asked this question earlier:

CSS box shadow not truly transparent?

And I realize that I do not really know what a .png file is. .bmps are just uncompressed bitmaps, .jpgs are bitmaps compressed using the special jpeg algorithm, and I thought .pngs were just bitmaps compressed losslessly using some special png algorithm.

However, it turns out .pngs can be indexed colors like gifs (still losslessly?) and Adobe Fireworks can make special "Fireworks PNG"s which are editable, letting the user drag and drop stuff around the image a.l.a. MS Word document but still allowing them to be readable by "standard" image processing stuff (browsers, paint.net, etc.) as a normal .png.

What gives? Clearly there is way more to the .png format than just losslessly compressed bitmaps.

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closed as off topic by Mat, Book Of Zeus, bkaid, martin clayton, Robert Harvey Nov 12 '11 at 19:04

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Maybe you should consider reading the specification: w3.org/TR/PNG –  esaj Oct 29 '11 at 15:19
    
PNGs can have indexed colors, but the palette of colors is less limited, and the additional "features" may be a result of data added in the places of the files ignored by " common readers " (this was possible even with older formats). –  Tadeck Oct 29 '11 at 15:24
    
I looked through the technical details, but it went way over my head. I was hoping for a short ~paragraph length overview of where the complexity and moving parts are, not pages and pages of the scanline algorithm used in the compression and the size of individual pixels =D –  Li Haoyi Oct 29 '11 at 15:25
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2 Answers

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Standard PNGs don't support editing. Simplifying it a bit, they are just what you said they are: losslessly compressed bitmaps (vs JPGs, which employ lossy compression, or GIFs which are also bitmaps, but only support up to a 256 color palette).

Fireworks PNGs contain a special header and extra data that allows them to retain vector and layer information. But they are not standard PNGs.

Adobe's reference page:

Fireworks PNG files contain a second "chunk" of data that other applications can't read, which contains proprietary information about things like slicing, interactivity, and any Live Effects that may have been applied.

And finally, to address this:

What gives? Clearly there is way more to the .png format than just losslessly compressed bitmaps.

Yes, there is more to PNG than the standard. Extensions have been added to standard PNG that allow for animation, for example.

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I thought .pngs were just bitmaps compressed losslessly using some special png algorithm.

Well, they basically are. The lossless compression algorithm is a simple prediction filter followed by the standad Lempel-Ziv compression. It supports several image depth/formats (RGB with/without alpha channel ; gray ; palette) and it also supports some standard meta information ("Chunks"). Among these metainformation there are things like pysical resolution (DPI), and, in the case of paletted images some transparent colors.

The specification is open

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