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*Note: lxml will not run on my system. I was hoping to find a solution that does not involve lxml.

I have gone through some of the documentation around here already, and am having difficulties getting this to work how I would like to. I would like to parse some XML file that looks like this:

<dict>
    <key>1375</key>
    <dict>
        <key>Key 1</key><integer>1375</integer>
        <key>Key 2</key><string>Some String</string>
        <key>Key 3</key><string>Another string</string>
        <key>Key 4</key><string>Yet another string</string>
        <key>Key 5</key><string>Strings anyone?</string>
    </dict>
</dict>

In the file I am trying to manipulate, there are more 'dict' that follow this one. I would like to read through the XML and output a text/dat file that would look like this:

1375, "Some String", "Another String", "Yet another string", "Strings anyone?"

...

Eof

** Originally, I tried to use lxml, but after many tries to get it working on my system, I moved on to using DOM. More recently, I tried using Etree to do this task. Please, for the love of all that is good, would somebody help me along with this? I am relatively new to Python and would like to learn how this works. I thank you in advance.

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1  
What OS and version of Python? –  Acorn Oct 29 '11 at 16:10
    
You have the number 1375 twice. Can this be two different numbers? If so, which do you want? –  John Machin Oct 29 '11 at 21:33
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marked as duplicate by Junuxx, Rachel Gallen, plaes, p.s.w.g, Wouter van Nifterick Mar 27 '13 at 1:10

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can use xml.etree.ElementTree which is included with Python. There is an included companion C-implemented (i.e. much faster) xml.etree.cElementTree. lxml.etree offers a superset of the functionality but it's not needed for what you want to do.

The code provided by @Acorn works identically for me (Python 2.7, Windows 7) with each of the following imports:

import xml.etree.ElementTree as et
import xml.etree.cElementTree as et
import lxml.etree as et
...
tree = et.fromstring(xmltext)
...

What OS are you using and what installation problems have you had with lxml?

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I'm using Ubuntu Maverick Meerkat Netbook installation...the latest lxml installation attempt included this message in my terminal: Unpacking python-lxml (from .../python-lxml_2.2.6-1_i386.deb) ... Setting up firmware-b43-installer (4.150.10.5-4) ... Not supported low-power chip with PCI id 14e4:4315! Aborting. –  PleaseHelpTheNewGuy Oct 29 '11 at 22:21
    
I just tried the new imports with the code and got this error: Traceback (most recent call last): File "/home/worky.py", line 5, in <module> import lxml.etree as et ImportError: No module named lxml.etree –  PleaseHelpTheNewGuy Oct 29 '11 at 22:26
    
(1) About your Ubuntu installation problem: I suggest that you try the lxml mailing list. (2) "No module named lxml.etree" ... that's because it's not installed. Have only one import active at a time; comment out the other two. –  John Machin Oct 29 '11 at 23:08
    
ok, John, that kind of helps, I'm messing around with the code now... I might be able to swing it with this code, although... it's not exactly what I need... if I can get it to work, it IS what I need I guess. Thanks for the tips. –  PleaseHelpTheNewGuy Oct 29 '11 at 23:12
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import xml.etree.ElementTree as et
import csv

xmltext = """
<dicts>
    <key>1375</key>
    <dict>
        <key>Key 1</key><integer>1375</integer>
        <key>Key 2</key><string>Some String</string>
        <key>Key 3</key><string>Another string</string>
        <key>Key 4</key><string>Yet another string</string>
        <key>Key 5</key><string>Strings anyone?</string>
    </dict>
</dicts>
"""

f = open('output.txt', 'w')

writer = csv.writer(f, quoting=csv.QUOTE_NONNUMERIC)

tree = et.fromstring(xmltext)

# iterate over the dict elements
for dict_el in tree.iterfind('dict'):
    data = []
    # get the text contents of each non-key element
    for el in dict_el:
        if el.tag == 'string':
            data.append(el.text)
        # if it's an integer element convert to int so csv wont quote it
        elif el.tag == 'integer':
            data.append(int(el.text))
    writer.writerow(data)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for posting so soon. The problem is, I cannot get lxml to run on my machine. I have python 2.7 and have made several attempts to get that module installed, but have failed. I was hoping there was another way that doesn't involve lxml. –  PleaseHelpTheNewGuy Oct 29 '11 at 21:14
1  
What OS are you running? –  Acorn Oct 29 '11 at 21:40
    
I'm running Ubuntu Maverick Meerkat Netbook edition... –  PleaseHelpTheNewGuy Oct 29 '11 at 22:27
    
How are you trying to install it? have you tried installing it with PIP? –  Acorn Oct 29 '11 at 22:31
    
Ok, I am installing pip now, I will try to figure out how to use it to install it. BTW, it's snowing in New York... wth?! and thanks for the help. –  PleaseHelpTheNewGuy Oct 29 '11 at 22:35
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