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Using "ordinary C", I wish to compare two 8 bit bytes to determine if the second is the bitwise complement of the first. For example if Byte1 is binary 00001111 (15 in decimal) I want to test whether or not Byte2 is binary 11110000 (240 in decimal). I expected to do this using unsigned chars to represent the bytes, the C bitwise NOT operator "~" and a simple if( == ) test.

Can anyone explain for me why the following code doesn't work (ie. I expect it to output "True" but it actually outputs "False").

unsigned char X = 15;
unsigned char Y = 240;  

if( Y == ~X)
    printf("True");
else
    printf("False");

I guess I could XOR the bytes together then test for 255, but why doesn't the above if( == ) comparison work ?

Thanks,

Martin.

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(Whoops, looks like I added my comments (Further questions) in the wrong place...) @Jens Thanks Ben and Jens and others. I am sure what you say is the cause of my difficulty. But just to make sure I understand... –  Martin Irvine Oct 29 '11 at 20:16
1  
Lets say its a 16 bit system. So 15 decimal gets promoted to 00000000 00001111 binary, then gets complemented to 11111111 11110000 binary. Then this is to be compared to 240 decimal, which I guess gets promoted to 16 bits too, to facilitate the comparison, so we end up comparing 11111111 11110000 and 00000000 11110000, which obviously aren't equal. Ok, that makes sense. @Ben –  Martin Irvine Oct 29 '11 at 20:17
    
I have noticed if I declare the "bytes" as "signed char"s, the comparison works. Does this mean when the 240 gets promoted to 16 bits, it's actually interpreted as -16 (two's complement), so when it gets promoted to 16 bits it gets sign extended to 11111111 11110000 and so it does compare as equal to ~15. Is this what's going on ? So pehaps using signed chars is a good / valid solution ? What do you think ? Thank you for your assistance, Martin. –  Martin Irvine Oct 29 '11 at 20:17

2 Answers 2

Because integral promotion causes the math on the right side to be done as int. If you assigned the result back to a char like unsigned char Z = ~X those upper bits would be truncated off again and Y == Z.

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1  
…or use a cast (z == (char)~x) –  sidyll Oct 29 '11 at 18:33
2  
@sidyll: you'd need to cast to unsigned char -- char might get sign extended –  Chris Dodd Oct 29 '11 at 19:05
    
@ChrisDodd Sure, sorry about that. –  sidyll Oct 29 '11 at 19:09
1  
You can also explicitly truncate those bits with & 0xFF. –  caf Oct 30 '11 at 2:38

The ~ operator causes its operands to be promoted to int before being complemented. ~15 is not 240 but some other value, depending on the size of int.

Just use if (X + Y == 255) and it should work.

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1  
Since the concern here is bits, I think if ((X ^ Y) == 255) may be more instructive here. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 29 '11 at 18:49
    
Thanks Ben and Jens and others. I am sure what you say is the cause of my difficulty. But just to make sure I understand... –  Martin Irvine Oct 29 '11 at 19:42
    
Lets say its a 16 bit system. So 15 decimal gets promoted to 00000000 00001111 binary, then gets complemented to 11111111 11110000 binary. Then this is to be compared to 240 decimal, which I guess gets promoted to 16 bits too, to facilitate the comparison, so we end up comparing 11111111 11110000 and 00000000 11110000, which obviously aren't equal. Ok, that makes sense. –  Martin Irvine Oct 29 '11 at 20:06
    
I have noticed if I declare the "bytes" as "signed char"s, the comparison works. Does this mean when the 240 gets promoted to 16 bits, it's actually interpreted as -16 (two's complement), so when it gets promoted to 16 bits it gets sign extended to 11111111 11110000 and so it does compare as equal to ~15. Is this what's going on ? So pehaps using signed chars is a good / valid solution ? What do you think ? Thank you for your assistance, Martin. –  Martin Irvine Oct 29 '11 at 20:07
    
Yes. Promotion is value-respecting, so a byte 0xF0, interpreted as a signed char has value -16 and the promotion sign-extends it. For testing bitwise complement, using signed char is a valid solution, because if the two are bitwise complements of each other, exactly one of them is negative. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 29 '11 at 20:22

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