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I have a set of xsd files for different datatypes. In the Java world what is the best way to generate a list of the properties of the types?

e.g. with these two files.

file: customer.xsd

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1" ?>
<xs:schema xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
<xs:element name="customer">
  <xs:complexType>
    <xs:sequence>
      <xs:element name="number" type="xs:integer"/>
      <xs:element name="name" type="xs:string"/>
      <xs:element name="address" type="xs:string"/>
    </xs:sequence>
  </xs:complexType>
</xs:element>
</xs:schema>

file: order.xsd

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1" ?>
<xs:schema xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
<xs:element name="customer">
  <xs:complexType>
    <xs:sequence>
      <xs:element name="orderid" type="xs:integer"/>
      <xs:element name="customer="xs:string"/>
    </xs:sequence>
  </xs:complexType>
</xs:element>
</xs:schema>

I'd like to do two things

1. a Java application which reads in the XSD and processes then (somehow?). So when you run the program it can print the properties out

> java -jar printtypes.jar -f customer.xsd
> number : Integer
> name : String
> address : String

2. some kind of transformation which generates a new file

file: customer.properties

<propertylist>
<prop>
 <name> orderid </name>
 <type> integer </type>
</prop>
<prop>
 <name> customer </name>
 <type> string</type>
</prop>
</propertylist>

I tried to implement the program in (1) above using java reflection to interrogate Java classes generated by JAXB. This created an instance of the class and interrogated the values and fields, but it does not work where values are composed of a sequence that is empty. There is no way to get back to the original type of the value due to type erasure. You end up with an empty ArrayList of something, but you don't know what.

I'm from the C++ work so I'm a bit lost with all this Java technology at the moment. My Google powers have failed me - most of the JAVA/XSD posts I've seen talk about validation which is not what I want to do.

Thanks in advance

D

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2  
actually, you are incorrect about the type loss due to type erasure. class members maintain their generic information, so you should be able to get everything you need via reflection. –  jtahlborn Oct 29 '11 at 20:06
    
To be precice, a field's declared type is available to the reflection API in its entirety. Erasure only affects the querying of runtime types, i.e. if you have an object it is in general impossible to discover its type parameters. –  meriton Oct 29 '11 at 20:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You might want to look into XSOM, its a project that will ingest your XML schema and produce objects that you can traverse and produce your desired results.

http://xsom.java.net/userguide.html

Parsing schema by hand can be really tricky because there can be different ways to say basically the same thing.

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Thanks all, I'm working on Problem 1 fist so I've had a look at the XSOM approach. It looked a bit better than using XPATH if more strongly typed. But I've got a bit stuck on the details of how XSOM works. Rather than comment here I've asked a new question link –  DUFF Oct 30 '11 at 22:38
    
The API takes a little bit of time to digest, but I think its probably more robust than using xslt. Although if you need quick and dirty with a limited-life project xslt isn't a bad choice. I haven't heard of SCM, but if it does the same thing and has a similar API it might be worth a look too. –  Bill Nov 2 '11 at 4:49

Problem 1. can be solved using XPath. For instance this expression:

/xs:schema/xs:element/xs:complexType/xs:sequence/xs:element/@name

will return all names:

  • number
  • name
  • address

See also: Document - How to get a tag's value by its name?

For problem 2. XSLT is a perfect fit. Here is a quick and dirty transformation:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" 
       xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" 
       xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
<xsl:template match="/xs:schema/xs:element/xs:complexType/xs:sequence">
<propertylist>
    <xsl:for-each select="xs:element">
    <prop>
        <name><xsl:value-of select="@name"/></name>
        <type><xsl:value-of select="@type"/></type>
    </prop>
    </xsl:for-each>
</propertylist>
</xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When applied to customer.xsd it yields:

<propertylist xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
    <prop>
        <name>number</name>
        <type>xs:integer</type>
    </prop>
    <prop>
        <name>name</name>
        <type>xs:string</type>
    </prop>
    <prop>
        <name>address</name>
        <type>xs:string</type>
    </prop>
</propertylist>

Interestingly, you don't need Java for both of your problems.

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:Does XPath expression return the type of number or name? –  Cratylus Oct 29 '11 at 19:21
1  
@user384706 : why don't you try it? On linux you can use the command line tools xsltproc and xmllint. –  extraneon Oct 29 '11 at 19:26
    
Look carefully, if you use /xs:schema/xs:element/xs:complexType/xs:sequence/xs:element/@type it will return: [xs:integer, xs:string, xs:string]. If you only query ``/xs:schema/xs:element/xs:complexType/xs:sequence/xs:element` you will get a list of 3 xs:elements which you can then subquery for @name and @type each. –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Oct 29 '11 at 19:27
    
I would recommend strongly against working from the XSD documents directly. There are too many ways in XSD to say the same thing, and it's very hard to write code that correctly copes with the full generality of the XSD language. –  Michael Kay Oct 30 '11 at 20:39

XSOM as suggested above is one approach.

Another approach is Saxon's SCM. The Saxon schema processor will read a set of schema documents and output the corresponding schema component model in an XML representation called SCM. This is then much more amenable to processing than the original XSD documents. Probably XSOM makes more sense if you want to do the subsequent processing in Java, Saxon SCM makes more sense if you want to do it in XSLT or XQuery.

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