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Given that web apps should always redirect after a POST (or any non-repeatable request to change server-side state) ...

... how are people using MVC3 Model Validation and performing the mandatory redirect?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Usually you only redirect after a successful post (no Model Validation errors), otherwise you send back the page with a validation error message.

The redirect in the PRG pattern prevents double-posting, so there's no harm to send back the same page (+ error message) because the post was not successful and will not be unless something changes to make validation pass.

Edit:

It looks like you're looking for passing ModelState to the next (redirected) request. This can be done by using TempData to store ModelState up to the next request. FYI, TempData uses Session.

This can be implemented with ActionFilters. Examples can be found in the MvcContrib project code: ModelStateToTempDataAttribute

This has also been mentioned together with other tips in a 'best practices' article on weblogs.asp.net (seems the author has moved the blog, but I couldn't find the article on the new blog). From the article:

One of the issue with this pattern is when a validation fails or any exception occurs you have to copy the ModelState into TempData. If you are doing it manually, please stop it, you can do this automatically with Action Filters, like the following:

Controller

[AcceptVerbs(HttpVerbs.Get), OutputCache(CacheProfile = "Dashboard"), StoryListFilter, ImportModelStateFromTempData]
public ActionResult Dashboard(string userName, StoryListTab tab, OrderBy orderBy, int? page)
{
    //Other Codes
    return View();
}

[AcceptVerbs(HttpVerbs.Post), ExportModelStateToTempData]
public ActionResult Submit(string userName, string url)
{
    if (ValidateSubmit(url))
    {
        try
        {
            _storyService.Submit(userName, url);
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            ModelState.AddModelError(ModelStateException, e);
        }
    }

    return Redirect(Url.Dashboard());
}

Action Filters

public abstract class ModelStateTempDataTransfer : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    protected static readonly string Key = typeof(ModelStateTempDataTransfer).FullName;
}

public class ExportModelStateToTempData : ModelStateTempDataTransfer
{
    public override void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext filterContext)
    {
        //Only export when ModelState is not valid
        if (!filterContext.Controller.ViewData.ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            //Export if we are redirecting
            if ((filterContext.Result is RedirectResult) || (filterContext.Result is RedirectToRouteResult))
            {
                filterContext.Controller.TempData[Key] = filterContext.Controller.ViewData.ModelState;
            }
        }

        base.OnActionExecuted(filterContext);
    }
}

public class ImportModelStateFromTempData : ModelStateTempDataTransfer
{
    public override void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext filterContext)
    {
        ModelStateDictionary modelState = filterContext.Controller.TempData[Key] as ModelStateDictionary;

        if (modelState != null)
        {
            //Only Import if we are viewing
            if (filterContext.Result is ViewResult)
            {
                filterContext.Controller.ViewData.ModelState.Merge(modelState);
            }
            else
            {
                //Otherwise remove it.
                filterContext.Controller.TempData.Remove(Key);
            }
        }

        base.OnActionExecuted(filterContext);
    }
}
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2  
That isn't correct. There is much harm ... all POSTs must be followed by redirect. (1) This is only way to remove the POST request from browser history (2) Otherwise users pressing BACK or REFRESH will get confusing and annoying "resend" confirmation (3) A user electing to "resend" has no way of knowing what the end result of the action might be! This has been a hallmark of professional-quality web apps for over 15 years. (Not common in ASP or ASP.NET web apps though) Furthermore even a GET that attempts a non-repeatable state change should be redirected. –  Jack Oct 29 '11 at 23:23
    
My point was simply that if Model validation fails, server state is not changed and therefore even if the same POST request is resubmitted, server state still won't change. But if you feel strongly about suppressing annoying resend confirmations for this particular case (failed POST with no server state changes), why don't you simply redirect? You'll probably need a session (TempData for example) to carry on at least the validation error message to the redirected request and inform the user why the POST failed. But then again, displaying session state in a GET request is not very RESTful... –  marapet Oct 30 '11 at 0:23
    
"server state is not changed" // this request it isn't, but you are assuming that next time it won't be changed also // you can not make that assumption // also that is only part of the problem // and duplicate catching has to be done server side to be robust // "simply redirect" how do I access the ModelState on the next request? –  Jack Oct 31 '11 at 7:44
    
I edited and linked to example code. I hope this is what you're looking for. –  marapet Oct 31 '11 at 11:24
    
I like this approach, thanks for sharing –  Rippo Jun 23 '12 at 15:01

What you mean by the "mandatory" redirect? Often we use a try/catch in controller, if try is successful, you can either redirect to a View(if you NEED to) or can also return any partial view, or anything you need. The catch is often redisplaying the original page with error message since the post request is not success.

Hope I did not misunderstand you :)

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"mandatory" for professional web apps - check with fiddler - watch how Google or IBM or PayPal or EBay do it ... it is rare for ASP or ASP.NET web apps to implement this correctly because Microsoft never shows the technique in their examples (they don't want to confuse people) –  Jack Oct 30 '11 at 10:26

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