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I am trying to make a simple markup language, and I need my Cocoa app to be able to read it. I would prefer to have that code written in Objective-c, but I am happy to use any other language.

Here is my current problem. I am using this code:

for (int character = 1; character < ([script length] - 1); character ++) {
    NSLog(@"%@", [[script substringToIndex:character] substringFromIndex:([[script substringToIndex:character] length] - 2)]);

Unfortunately, if I pass the string [button] through it, it shows this in the debug console:

[
[b
[bu
[but
[butt
[__NSCFConstantString substringWithRange:]: Range or index out of bounds

I can sort out the error message, but I need to know how to read the script and recognize certain tags like [button]. Can anybody give me a link to something useful on this subject?

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1  
Sorry, but as a word of advice try something simpler. Parsing might not be a simple task if you're having "fencepost" errors. –  sidyll Oct 29 '11 at 18:57
    
That is what I am asking here. What can I do to achieve the same effect? –  Justin Oct 29 '11 at 18:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just to give you examples:

NSString *str = @"[Button]";
NSUInteger i, len = [str length];

for (i = 1; i <= len; ++i)
    NSLog(@"%@", [str substringToIndex:i]);

for (i = 0; i < len; ++i)
    NSLog(@"%c", [str characterAtIndex:i]);

Output:

[
[B
[Bu
[But
[Butt
[Butto
[Button
[Button]
[
B
u
t
t
o
n
]

And a more interesting case:

for (i = 0; i < len; ++i)
    NSLog([NSString stringWithFormat:@"%%%dc", i+1],
          [str characterAtIndex:i]);

Which produces:

[
 B
  u
   t
    t
     o
      n
       ]
share|improve this answer

This all depends on how complex your scripting language is intended to be, and how efficient and robust it needs to be.

In general, if you don't need a rich syntax, you might be best using XML or JSON for your syntax, and just applying your own semantics to one of those.

Otherwise, parsing is a fairly large, complex field within programming, and you should study up a bit before you dive in (there are dozens of good references, on the web and in books). I've written 20 or so "simple" parsers over my decades of experience, and I can attest that it's never as easy as you expect.

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Can you give me a link to some of those web references? –  Justin Oct 29 '11 at 19:07
    
    
In terms of hardcover books, the trio Alfred V. Aho, Ravi Sethi, and Jeffrey D. Ullman, together and separately, wrote maybe a dozen books on compiler topics. Any one of those would likely be worthwhile to at least skim through. Some appear to be available for download on the web. –  Hot Licks Oct 29 '11 at 21:29

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