Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a website for which I am building in "categories" which would work pretty much like the tags of StackOverflow.

What I am confused about it how to best structure the tables for this sort of a thing. For example, I know I'd need a table to structure the actual categories like the name, who made it, what date it was made, etc.

What I am not sure about is: when a record gets n number of different categories, how to store that in the database. Should I have the record_ids in the item table to which the categories belong, and just comma-separate the its? Or should I have a separate table with something like item_categories with item_id, category_id, etc...and just join that table and the item table, and the categories table when getting the category?

The ladder seems slow because of the join, but more organized and clean.

Or is there another way to structure this that I have not thought of? How is a good way to go about structuring this sort of data?

Thanks!!

share|improve this question
    
Everyone is suggesting making the 3 table design. But my concern there is will it make things too slow with all the joining? :( –  Genadinik Oct 29 '11 at 19:45
    
Relational databases are pretty good at joining tables, index things properly and don't worry about it too much. –  mu is too short Oct 29 '11 at 19:53
1  
I got queries with over 10 joins on a production server under heavy load. Usually not a problem at all, as long as you build proper indexes. For a personal site with maybe a 100 pages, each with a couple of tags, there's nothing to worry about at all. –  GolezTrol Oct 29 '11 at 20:08
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Make three tables. One for the page, one for the categories (along with meta information etc), and one to bind them together. That last table only need to have a pageid and a categoryid, to link records from both tables together.

Don't ever store comma separated values in a database.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the last bit. –  Billy ONeal Oct 30 '11 at 2:37
add comment

You should use a separate table like you say. It's called normalization.

If you're using a column with comma separated values think of the performance when accessing the values versus doing a join. You will have to split every value and then do a comparison to see if there's a match.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Or should I have a separate table with something like item_categories with item_id, category_id, etc...and just join that table and the item table, and the categories table when getting the category?

Yes, this. That's a classic M:N relationship in SQL.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.