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struct node
{
    int coef;

    int exp;

    struct node *link;
};

typedef struct node *NODE;
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6  
Please don't hide pointer types behind typedefs in real code though. –  Ed S. Oct 29 '11 at 20:03
2  
bad taste. SCNR –  ninjalj Oct 29 '11 at 20:46
    
what would be the better way to write this code.In the book structure is used in 3 to 4 ways... –  Skr Oct 29 '11 at 20:47
    
@Skr: be explicit and use struct node * instead of NODE. It's more readable, IMHO. –  ninjalj Oct 29 '11 at 21:05
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4 Answers

It defines NODE as a synonym for the type struct node *, so when you'll be declaring a variable of type NODE you'll be actually declaring a pointer to struct node.

Personally, I don't think that such declaration is a good idea: you're "hiding a pointer" (which is almost always a bad idea), and, moreover, you are not highlighting this fact in any way into the new name.

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4  
+1 for "Don't hide pointer types behind a typedef" –  Ed S. Oct 29 '11 at 20:04
1  
+1 for the same reason. Naming it nodeptr instead of node would help, but then there's no reason to typedef it at all. –  Seth Carnegie Oct 29 '11 at 20:11
1  
"Don't hide pointer types behind a typedef" what do you mean by this –  Skr Oct 29 '11 at 20:43
1  
He means that with that typedef you'll be working with a pointer type (struct node *) without making it evident to one that first reads your code (who just sees NODE, and probably assumes it's not a pointer). –  Matteo Italia Oct 29 '11 at 20:49
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It makes NODE a typedef for a struct node *.

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1  
what would be a better way to write this code...retaining the same meaning. –  Skr Oct 29 '11 at 20:45
3  
A better way would be to omit the typedef, and refer to the pointer type as struct node *. –  Keith Thompson Oct 29 '11 at 22:04
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NODE becomes an alias for struct node*.


EDIT: Okay, for the comment (if I write my answer as comment, it would be too long and not formatted):

There's no different way to write this. Here, typedef is used just to create a synonym/alias for pointer to struct node.
An example for usage would be:

void f()
{
    // some code
    NODE p = NULL;
    // do something with p
    // for example use malloc and so on
    // like: p = malloc( sizeof( struct node ) );
    // and access like: p->coef = ..; p->expr = ..
    // do something with p and free the memory later (if malloc is used)
}

is the same as

void f()
{
    // some code
    struct node* p = NULL;
    // do something with p
}

Using NODE makes it just shorter (anyway, I wouldn't advise such typedef, as you're hiding, that it's a pointer, not a struct or other type, as mentioned in @Matteo Italia's answer).


The format, you're referring: "typedef struct{}type_name format" is something else. It's kind of a trick in C, to avoid writing struct keyword (as it's obligatory in C, and NOT in C++). So

typedef struct node
{
    //..
} NODE;

would make NODE alias for struct node. So, the same example as above:

void f()
{
    // some code
    NODE p;
    // do something with p
    // note that now p is automatically allocated, it's real struct
    // not a pointer. So you can access its members like:
    // p.coef or p.expr, etc.
}

is the same as

void f()
{
    // some code
    struct node p;
    // do something with p
}

NOTE that now, p is NOT a pointer, it's struct node.

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can u write the same code in different way. how to write the same code in typedef struct{}type_name; format??? –  Skr Oct 29 '11 at 21:30
    
Well, see my edit, I hope it makes it more clear. –  Kiril Kirov Oct 29 '11 at 21:45
    
thanks so much,i got it this time. –  Skr Oct 29 '11 at 21:51
    
You're welcome :) –  Kiril Kirov Oct 29 '11 at 21:52
1  
No, you should put the * after the definition of the struct, like this: typedef struct node { /* sth */ } *NODE;. You can even make 2 types like this (and I'd recommend that): typedef struct node { /* sth */ } NODE, *NODE_PTR, where NODE will be typedef for struct node and NODE_PTR will be typedef for struct node*. –  Kiril Kirov Oct 29 '11 at 22:08
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what does typedef struct node *NODE indicate?

IT INDICATES A PERSON WHO HAS NOT LEARNED THAT UPPERCASE IS NO GOOD

Reserve ALL UPPERCASE identifiers for MACROS.

Cheers & hth.,

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Also, I don't think it's a good idea to let NODE contains * –  Peter Lee Jun 26 '13 at 3:54
    
@PeterLee: Thanks, I didn't think of mentioning that. Hm, I find it curious that the most upvoted answer is one that does not answer the question about what this "indicates", and that this answer, the only one addressing the question, has been downvoted. Such is SO. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jul 19 '13 at 1:11
    
Even if you are very solid and cool. Even if you have good tips for the case. It is not too good idea to humiliate people. B.t.w. it is not an appropriate answer for the question. This is the main cause to downvote the answer. –  I159 Jan 27 at 21:47
    
@I159: You're arguing that the downvoters thought the OP asked about the meaning of his/her own code (necessarily wrong), and that I was humiliating the code's author (ditto, just wrong). There are some pretty smart folks in the C++ lounge (in particular litb is about twice as smart as me), but the idea of really really stupid downvoters, as you advocate, is consistent with my SO experience. So i would not dismiss the notion that you might be right. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jan 28 at 0:29
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